Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

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    Thurs 8:45 am

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Posts Tagged ‘Calcium’

Mushrooms – Not a Superfood, But Super Good

Posted by terrepruitt on February 28, 2012

My family has always eaten mushrooms.  I have not.  I remember a time when I didn’t like them.  I remember that I started liking them. Not too long after I started liking them, my grandfather, who was the one that cooked them how I liked them, starting his bizarre food behaviors.  The way he cooked the mushrooms by which I started liking them was sauteing them with browned butter and a ton of garlic.  Then he started adding all types of things, things that might not actually belong mixed together.  But my grandfather’s decline is not the subject of this post.  Neither is the fact that he was the one that introduced me to mushrooms.  The subject of this post is mushrooms.  There was a time and I mentioned it before in my Some Foods Can Boost Your Immune System post, when mushrooms were not thought to have much nutritional value.  In fact, I remember my mother and I talking about that.  We had thought that mushrooms were pretty much nationally void.  But now-a-days that is not the case.  Mushrooms are not a superfood, but they do have nutritional value.

Mushrooms are a fungus.  There are many kind, I know, but I am talking about the plain white variety.  The ones that really go with almost anything savory.  I mean the other kind are good, but some of them have a very strong flavor so they might drown out a delicate sauce or flavor.  But the white ones are pretty plain, so you can make them any flavor you’d like — pretty much.  At the same time receive their nutritional benefits.

Mushrooms can be eaten raw or cooked.  When I eat them raw it is usually in a salad or in as part of a veggie tray with dip.  Oh, we also do use them as a dipper when eating cheese fondue.

ance Exercies, Nia, Nia Campbell, Campbell Nia, Nia classes in Campbell, evening Nia, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia,Per the USDA Nutrient Database the nutritional value for about 3.5 oz of mushrooms is:

about 27 Calories

Carbohydrates 4.1 g

Fat 0.1 g

Protein 2.5 g

Thiamine (vit. B1)  0.1 mg (9%)

Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.5 mg (42%)

Niacin (vit. B3) 3.8 mg (25%)

Pantothenic acid (B5) 1.5 mg (30%)

Vitamin C 0 mg (0%)

Calcium 18 mg (2%)

Phosphorus 120 mg (17%)

Potassium 448 mg (10%)

Sodium 6 mg (0%)

Zinc 1.1 mg (12%)

So with that information we can see there is a good amount vitamin B in mushrooms.  It seems that mushrooms can be forced to make vitamin D.  The process can be compared to how we convert sunshine on our skin to vitamin D.  Mushrooms have a chemical called ergosterol, which, when exposed to UV light is converted to vitamin D.

Wiki states:  “Testing conducted by the Pennsylvania State University showed an hour of UV light exposure made a serving of mushrooms contain twice the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s daily recommendation of vitamin D. Testing by the Monterey Mushrooms Company demonstrated 5 minutes of UV light exposure made a serving of mushrooms contain four times the FDA’s daily recommendation of vitamin D.”

Which is funny to me because I thought mushrooms preferred dark.

On Fresh Mushrooms their antioxidant contents is cited.  Antioxidants are good for the immune system.  They help protect the cells from damage from free radical, which are thought to be the cause of many diseases.  Mushrooms contain the antioxidant Ergothioneine and the mineral Selenium which works as an antioxidant.

I love mushrooms.  I am happy that they are more than just good tasting, they are good for me.  We eat a lot of mushrooms.  Do you?  How many times a week would you say you have mushrooms?  How do you prepare them?  Do you eat them raw or do you cook them?

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Cucumber Uses

Posted by terrepruitt on July 5, 2011

Day flew by, even thought I didn’t teach a Nia class today, I am just now getting to my post.  I received this list a long time ago.  My plan was to research each fact to see if it was true. I realize that I could spend my time looking up each item and not really find out if it was true.  AND, I realized that my readers probably know better.  Some of you might have received this very same list.  Some of you might have tried some of these things.  And better yet, some of you might venture on this very post to comment on what you know.

1. Cucumbers contain most of the vitamins you need every day, just one cucumber contains Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B3, Vitamin B5, Vitamin B6, Folic Acid, Vitamin C, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium and Zinc.

2. Feeling tired in the afternoon, put down the caffeinated soda and pick up a cucumber. Cucumbers are a good source of B Vitamins and Carbohydrates that can provide that quick pick-me-up that can last for hours.

3. Tired of your bathroom mirror fogging up after a shower? Try rubbing a cucumber slice along the mirror, it will eliminate the fog and provide a soothing, spa-like fragrance.

4. Are grubs and slugs ruining your planting beds? Place a few slices in a small pie tin and your garden will be free of pests all season long. The chemicals in the cucumber react with the aluminum to give off a scent undetectable to humans but drive garden pests crazy and make them flee the area.

5. Looking to fight off that afternoon or evening snacking binge? Cucumbers have been used for centuries and often used by European trappers, traders and explores for quick meals to thwart off starvation.

6. Have an important meeting or job interview and you realize that you don’t have enough time to polish your shoes? Rub a freshly cut cucumber over the shoe, its chemicals will provide a quick and durable shine that not only looks great but also repels water.

7. Out of WD 40 and need to fix a squeaky hinge? Take a cucumber slice and rub it along the problematic hinge, and voila, the squeak is gone!

8. Stressed out and don’t have time for massage, facial or visit to the spa? Cut up an entire cucumber and place it in a boiling pot of water, the chemicals and nutrients from the cucumber with react with the boiling water and be released in the steam, creating a soothing, relaxing aroma that has been shown the reduce stress in new mothers and college students during final exams.

9. Just finish a business lunch and realize you don’t have gum or mints? Take a slice of cucumber and press it to the roof of your mouth with your tongue for 30 seconds to eliminate bad breath, the phytochemcials will kill the bacteria in your mouth responsible for causing bad breath.

10. Looking for a ‘green’ way to clean your faucets, sinks or stainless steel? Take a slice of cucumber and rub it on the surface you want to clean, not only will it remove years of tarnish and bring back the shine, but is won’t leave streaks and won’t harm you fingers or fingernails while you clean.

11. Using a pen and made a mistake? Take the outside of the cucumber and slowly use it to erase the pen writing, also works great on crayons and markers that the kids have used to decorate the walls!!

I am adding that a cucumber is mostly water.  And while their flavor is in their seeds, I have heard that it is the seeds that might also cause gas for some people.  In case you have received this list in an e-mail you may notice a couple missing, yeah, I removed them because I didn’t feel comfortable posting them.  I didn’t check on these except for the vitamins.  I wanted to give you an idea about that.

According to About.com a cup of sliced cucumbers contain the follow amounts of what is listed above:

•Calcium: 8 mg
•Iron: 0.15 mg
•Magnesium: 7 mg
•Phosphorus: 12 mg
•Potassium: 76 mg
•Zinc: 0.10 mg
•Vitamin C: 1.5 mg
•Thiamin (B1): 0.014 mg
•Riboflavin (B2): 0.017 mg
•Niacin (B3): 0.051 mg
•Pantothenic Acid (B5): 0.135 mg
•Vitamin B6: 0.021 mg
•Vitamin B12: 0 mg

As I typed this I made me want some cucumber water.

Have you tried any of these tips?  Do they work?  Let us know.

Posted in Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Balance of Acid and Alkaline

Posted by terrepruitt on August 12, 2010

Nia emphasizes balance.  Balance between yin and yang.  Balance between feminine and masculine.  Balance between strength and flexibility.  Our bodies systems work to keep balance.  I found this video extreme enlightening.  Even though the title makes it sound like it is all about how diet soda causes weight gain, it is not.

The video says our bodies have to have the right pH level, which is the acid/alkaline balance.  It explains that the body will keep the balance with several mechanism.  The body must be in balance or we will die.  What it goes on to explain is that the typical American Diet and life style has a tendency to make our bodies work really hard to keep that balance.  We eat too many acid producing foods and beverages and have fast pace lives that cause unhealthy stress.

It points out some of the foods that are acid forming and the ones that are not.  There are also examples of beverages given.  It goes onto explain that what happens to the body when it becomes to acidic is that is uses minerals to put the body back in balance.  The minerals are taken away from the other functions that the body needs them for. The video points out that while the United States has a high consumption of calcium rich foods, we have the worst bone health, because one of the minerals used to balance the body when it becomes to acidic is calcium.  Hmmm?  I wonder if that is why a lot of antacids have calcium in them.

The last minute or so is where they explain how diet soda causes weight gain.

In my next post I will share with you how this video came to me at the perfect time.  In the meantime leave a comment telling me what you think of this video.  I learned a lot from it.  Did you learn anything?  Did you find it interesting?

If you would like, check out the food target he mentions in the video.

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

Broccoli – An Amazing Food

Posted by terrepruitt on June 15, 2010

Broccoli is one of those vegetables that can be eaten raw or cooked.  When eaten raw people sometimes smother it in dip. While that does not take away from the nutrients of the broccoli itself it somewhat might help in defeating the purpose of eating healthy.  But that is fodder for another post.

A common way to cook broccoli is to steam it or boil it. One way to easily steam it is to stand the crowns up like little trees in a dish of shallow water and microwave it for a few seconds.  It depends on how much you want it cooked.  The less cooked better preserves the nutrients.  Boiling it might cook away some of the amazing nutrients that have been attributed to broccoli.

The amazing part of the nutrients of broccoli is that is has so many.  It is high in vitamin C, K, A, and is high in fiber.  It is believed to have anti cancer properties, such as sulforaphane and indoles which are phytonutrients.  This are nutrients found in plants that are thought to be nutrients that might help keep our bodies in check and in balance and not contribute to cancer.

Broccoli has been found to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

It might not smell pleasant while cooking it or after, but that is the sulfur that you smell.

1 cup of steamed broccoli has:

—over 100% of the Daily Value of vitamins C and K
—45% of the Daily Value of vitamin A
—20% of the Daily Value of dietary fiber
—15% of the Daily Value of potassium
—10% of the Daily Value of magnesium
—almost 10% of the Daily Value of protein and calcium

Broccoli has more vitamin C than an orange and more calcium than a glass of milk.  It really is a wonder vegetable.  Remember frozen CAN be just as good as “fresh”.

Broccoli has been found to help prevent heart disease.

Broccoli.  Are you a fan?  How do you eat yours?

Posted in Food, Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Tired, Not Enough Iron?

Posted by terrepruitt on December 15, 2009

Not too long ago I was feeling so tired.  I didn’t know why and I still don’t KNOW why, I think I know, but I am not sure.  I think I wasn’t getting enough iron.  I take Calcium supplements, they are Cal Complete so they have other stuff in them.  I understand and I like the idea of being able to get all the nutrients I need from food and not having to take a supplement.  But . . . I don’t think that is realistic for me.  I think that sometimes I just don’t eat all the nutrients I need.  Also, since our food is so altered who really knows if I am getting the nutrients I need from the food.  There are other reasons I food might not have all the nutrients we think, first of all the food can be altered (as I just stated), or it could be not as fresh as it needs to be for optimal nutrients, or I could be cooking some of the nutrients out.  Either way, I like the idea, but I don’t think it is entirely possible to get everything I need all the time from food.  And with calcium it is recommended to take a supplement anyway.

With calcium your body can only absorb so much at a time so it is recommended to take it twice a day.  I always take the “going to bed” one, but I was forgetting about the morning one.   And I think it was affecting me.  I eat a spinach salad almost every night so I thought I was getting enough iron through that, but apparently even though spinach has a lot of iron the body cannot absorb it that well.

 

 

 

 

There are two kinds of iron heme and nonheme.  Heme is found in meat and is most easily absorbed by the body.  Nonheme is typically found in plant sources and is not as easily absorbed.

I eat mostly chicken with about 1.1 milligrams per 3 oz. compared to beef at 2.2 to 3.2 milligrams per 3 oz.  Add my chicken to my salad, I have about 3.8 milligrams.  The total of the two is close to 20% of the recommended daily allowance.  So, if you add my two calcium pills with a total of 83% of the RDA you get 103%.  If I only take one then I am missing about 40%.  Now I don’t know if that is enough to make me feel like I did, but I thought, “Hey, let’s get back to my 83% and remember to take both pills and now I am feeling less tired.’”

Of course, only lab tests and a doctor can tell me what if it truly was low iron.  It could be a lot of things, but I just thought it was interesting that spinach doesn’t contain as much iron as I thought and absorbing it depends on what it is mixed with.  So I figure with the chicken I eat, the spinach I eat and the calcium with iron I take, in addition to anything else I am eating that might have iron in it, I really will be getting the RDA.
 

For a lot more information on iron:
http://dietary-supplements.info.nih.gov/factsheets/iron.asp

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Asparagus, Roasted

Posted by terrepruitt on March 14, 2009

I love to eat roasted asparagus.  I like it when it is really cooked, not burned, but crispy.  It is probably past the point of supreme nutrition, but that is my favorite way to eat it.  I do like it at its most nutritious, too, boiled until it is tender not soggy.  I haven’t always liked asparagus.  I believe the way vegetables are cooked now is different than from when I was growing up.  Plus, I believe that it is much easier to obtain a fresh vegetable now than when I was growing up.

Apparently the season is from March through August, but we eat it all year round.  To me it tastes better during the “Asparagus season”.

One of the reasons I love to eat it roasted is because it is so easy to cook.  I rinse it off, then chop off the ends—I don’t do that bend and break thing because holding the entire bunch in one hand and chopping with the other is much faster to me — then I line them up in a pan (I have a jelly roll pan).  I sprinkle olive oil on them.  I usually use garlic infused olive oil, but sometimes I go for the lemon olive oil.  Then I salt them and use whatever spices I feel like, then in they go.  I usually cook them at 400 degrees.  I let them bake for 15 minutes, then I flip them.  And let them go 15 minutes more, but you can take them out at anytime and they are delicious.  Sometimes I cook ‘em less, sometimes I cook ‘em more.  Depends on my mood and when the rest of the meal is ready.

Nutritional Value per 100 g  (3.5 oz) as per USDA Nutrient database

Calories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Carbohydrates . . . . . . . . . .3.88 g
Sugars . . . . . . . . . .1.88 g
Dietary fiber . . . . .2.1 g
Fat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.12 g
Protein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.20 g

In addition Asparagus contains Thiamine (Vit. B1), Riboflavin (Vit. B2), Niacin (Vit. B3), Pantothenic Acid (Vit. B5), Vitamin B6, Folate (Vit. B9), Vitamin C, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Zinc, and Manganese.

Seems to me like they are way worth the time and effort it takes to cook them.

What is your favorite way to cook asparagus?

Posted in Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »