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Borscht is Beets

Posted by terrepruitt on January 6, 2011

My husband tweeted today that a co-worker made him Borscht.  He said it was the perfect thing for a cold day like, today, it has been pretty cold for us here in the Bay Area.  He also said that he loved it and was hoping that I would try making it.  I had to look it up.  It is beet soup.  Beet soup.  Of course, I had to look at what beets have to offer.  The nutrients are found in both the greens and the root.  I am seeing some articles saying that they are doing a lot of new research on beets and they might claim it a super food – at least in a juice form.

Beets have anti-inflammatory affects along with antioxidant properties. As with most vegetables, the more you cook them the more the nutrients get destroyed.  The best way to get the most out of this vegetable is to juice it.  The next best is to steam it or roast it less than 15 to 20 minutes.  These methods give the nutrients the best chance of surviving and actually making it into your body.

One study showed that a little over 16 and a half ounces a day lowers blood pressure.  Another study showed that beet juice can increase endurance.

Beets contain potassium, folic acid, phytochemicals, vitamin C, vitamin A, and some of the Bs (B2, B3, B5, and B6), iron, and calcium.  The greens have an even higher level of iron, calcium, vitamin a, and potassium than the roots.

Beets are also a good source of fiber.

According to Wiki, in Russian cuisine, Borscht usually includes beets, meat, cabbage, and optionally potatoes.  The Borscht my hubby had was made by a Russian co-worker so that is what I will be experimenting with.  I am sure that eating beet soup will be a healthy addition to his diet.

I might try grating them to put on salads.  Also roasting, you know how I love roasted veggies.  Do you eat beets?  How do you eat ’em?

4 Responses to “Borscht is Beets”

  1. niachick said

    Beets are such a great nutritional item!!! Native Americans used beets for the red coloring, which if one is not careful, will absolutely stain whatever it touches! And one should remember that one ate beets…the elimination (#2, poop, whatever your term) of them can be quite surprising!

    We shave them into salads. We eat them cooked. We juice them. We add beet greens to other greens that we cook up.

    Beets are the best!

    Like

    • I saw information about urine being discolored. “An estimated 10-15% of all U.S. adults experience beeturia (a reddening of the urine) after consumption of beets in everyday amounts. While this phenomenon is not considered harmful in and of itself, it may be a possible indicator of the need for healthcare guidance in one particular set of circumstances involving problems with iron metabolism.” (from WH Foods)

      I will have to try beets. To me they taste like dirt so I am not a fan, but . . . . . I am sure I can find SOME way to consume them.

      Like

  2. Albert said

    Thanks for the nice post. Yes, I agree with the above comment which says that beets are great nutritional foods. Studies have proved that beets contain anthocyanins- an antioxidant flavonoids that provides protection against tumor growth and heart diseases. Therefore include beet in your diet and start living healthy.

    Like

    • Hi again,

      So did the study show that beets contain anthocyanins—which is know to provide protection against tumor growth and heart diseases? OR did the study show that the anthocyanins IN THE BEETS helped provide the protection? I’ve learned that just because something contains a substance know to “fight against” or “provide protection” it doesn’t always mean we get that from the food it is in. That’s how they can get away with certain advertising. They are careful not to claim the product does this or that, but they say a specific substance IN the product is know to do this or that. So I was just curious . . . . .

      Like

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