Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

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Archive for the ‘52 Moves (of Nia)’ Category

Chop Cut, One Of Nia’s 52 Moves

Posted by terrepruitt on February 22, 2017

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFitWell, it looks like I haven’t posted a Nia move from the Nia 52 Moves in a long time.  When I started my blog and website I wasn’t actually planning on posting about each and every move, but with only nine left that I have not posted about, I really might as well finish the list.  It might not be done quickly, but I will get to them all.  Why not, right?  Only nine, well, eight after this one, to go!  So today I am posting about the Chop Cut.

As with most, if not all, of the 52 Moves of Nia there is a specific way to do it, but then a lot of different ways it is done.  I will go out on a limb to say this move, the chop cut, is a common move.  I am sure many, many people have done this move whether they are dancing, practicing martial arts, or not.  It is just a common move.  Or at least I think of it as a common move.

To practice it as a Nia move, one of 52, we chop the air with the edge of our hands.  The edge of the hand we refer to as the blade side.  Using one hand at a time, raise the arm from the shoulder and bring it down.  Slice, with the blade, from up to down.  Allow the elbow to be slightly bent.  All fingers are extended.  Keep the hands active and engaged even the one that is not doing the slicing.

The Nia Technique book states the benefits as:

an excellent exercise for affirming your personal power.  This move is effective for building strength in the arms and shoulders, and it is superb for releasing stress.

The move itself can release stress but when combined with sounding it can be really effective.  The book recommends saying, “because.”  I usually have my class say, “HA!”

The ideal Chop Cut is using the whole arm and the blade of the hand.  Sometimes we might use straight arms.  At times while we are dancing, we might just make the movement from our elbows.  Just letting our forearms move, chopping at the air in front of us fast.  That kind of movement can be done faster than using the entire arm.  At times the chop can just be from the wrists.  So just the hands move.  It requires loose wrists.  This move can be done really fast.  Sometimes when we chop with our hands, we move them in the space around us, so we are moving more than just our wrists.  So the chop is coming from the wrists so it is more of “just a chop” than a “chop cut”.  The Chop Cut when done according to “specs,” is a power move.  The other ones are great and sometimes they fit better into the dance.

So, am I right?  Have you done a Chop Cut before?  Were you dancing?

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Elbow Strikes – One Of Nia’s 52 Moves

Posted by terrepruitt on June 6, 2016

You may know from reading my posts about Nia, or even other material about Nia, that it is made up of three groups of movement forms.  Those three groups of movement forms are made up of three movement forms.  The first group is Martial Arts, which include T’ai chi, Tae Kwon Do, and Aikido.  In martial arts we can have moves like punches, kicks, blocks, and strikes. The elbow strike is one of Nia’s 52 Moves.  Now remember, the 52 Moves of Nia are not moves that Nia claims are unique to Nia or that only Nia does.  The 52 Moves of Nia are named that because they are incorporated into the Nia Routines.  The Elbow Strike might even be able to be counted as three moves . . . perhaps not, but there are three ways to do it.  I am betting you understand that all three ways involve the elbow.  There is the elbow strike down, the elbow strike out, and the elbow strike back or the Downward Strike, the Outward Strike, and the Backward Strike.

To do this move you would first get into Riding Stance also know as Sumo Stance.  Have a strong and stable base.  Push into the earth with your feet. Engage through the core and the whole body.  The fists are in ready position, which is palms up, at chest height and at the side of the chest . . . so elbows are drawn back past the rib cage.  The downward strike is with the elbow moving downward into the open palm of the opposite hand.  The outward strike is the elbow moving out away from the body using the opposite hand to push the power through the elbow.  The backward strike has the opposite hand pushing the elbow backwards away from the body.  All of these are done on one side then the other.

As I have mentioned with all the moves, there is an exact way to practice it or them, in this case, if you are just practicing each move.  But when you are dancing the exactness can change.  In a Nia class, we might do elbow strikes from an A Stance or while we are stepping into a stance.  Or we might do them from a bow stance.  Sometimes we might not use the opposite hand to help push the power, or strike down into the open palm of the opposite hand.  It all depends on the dance.  The above is just to help you learn the move and how you would practice it on its own.

The Nia Technique Book says:  “Benefits:  Practicing Elbow Strikes is excellent for releasing stress and anxiety.  These moves will strengthen and define upper chest, back, hands, and arms and will enhance your sense of confident determination.”

Elbows strikes do feel powerful and give you a sense of confidence.  It is really fun to do them while sounding, perhaps saying, “HA!” or even just saying, “Strike!”

Well, what do you think?  Did you try it?  Can you feel the power in this move?

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Using Your Middle Finger

Posted by terrepruitt on May 4, 2016

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, PiYo, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFitIf you have ever taken a moment to look at the list of the Fifty-Two Nia Moves you might have wondered what the “Power Finger Crossover” is.  You probably figured out it has something to do with fingers as the name contains “finger” but perhaps that is as far as you had gotten.  You may have thought, “What is crossed over what?”  Well, the middle finger is considered the power finger in Nia.  It has a lot of power.  In some cultures it is considered a finger of communication ;-).  In Nia it is also called the balance finger.  With the power finger crossover in the 52 Nia Moves it can be used at many different times during a Nia routine.

First: how to – the way you do the power finger is to cross the middle finger, the power finger over the index finger.  Then you release the index finger and cross the power finger over the ring finger.  The arms remain long and extended.  The cross of the fingers is small.  Use both hands, doing the crossover at the same time on both hands.

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I can do the middle finger crossed over the index finger on both hands.  I can do the middle finger crossed over the ring finger on the left hand with out help.  But I have to use my left hand to cross my right middle finger over my right ring finger.  As you can imagine it takes a little strength and dexterity to cross the fingers over each other unaided.  It is obvious to me I need to practice more.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, PiYo, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFitThere is a routine in which we cross the ring finger over the pinky finger and for the longest time I could do it on my left hand, but had to help my right hand out.  But now I can cross both ring fingers over both pinky fingers without help.  So it really is just a matter of practice.

If you can do the crossing without helping great!  But if you can’t, it is fine to help your fingers until you can do it without the help of the other hand.  The fingers still get the benefit of flexibility.  And your brain gets the benefit of your digits being crossed.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, PiYo, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFitAccording to The Nia Technique (page 164) “practicing this move helps you extend energy along your arm bones and out through your hands, which keeps your neck and shoulders relaxes.  It creates positive tension in the hand and adds to awareness of the integration of the hand and arm.”

And as I said it helps strengthen the hands/fingers and brings dexterity to them.

This move is part of the moves of the upper extremities and is grouped under “Fingers”.  It can be done in combination with many of The Fifty-Two Nia Moves and during many of the Nia Routines.  It can be done at almost anytime in a Nia class.  During FreeDance or as part of a routine.   It can also be practiced throughout your day.

So did you try it?  Can you do it?  Can you do it on both hands without the help of the other hand?

 

 

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Deep, Not On The Surface

Posted by terrepruitt on March 24, 2015

A lot of movement forms, from different dances to different types of exercise regimes, use chest isolations.  One of Nia’s 52 Moves.  See, as I have said over and over, not unique to Nia, but something that we use in our routines.  Something we can say and people know what the move is.  Even if they can’t do it, they know what it is.  This move moves the chest so – as with a lot of moves that involve the movement of the chest – some people are hesitant to do it.  Some people think of moves that move the chest as moves that moves the breasts and for some people this creates a lot of issues.  As a woman, there are some moves that are just going to move the breasts but that is not the focus.  Often times when I encourage people to focus on what is actually the focus of the movement, they can release any feelings or ideas that might be blocking the movement.  I mentioned this in my post about the Shimmy.  I have seen relief or understanding pass over people’s faces when they take the focus off of what is part of the front of the body/chest and onto the back when it comes to the shimmy.  The same with the chest isolations.  Your chest is moving that means everything connected to it, but the focus is on the muscles and the bones.

The movement of the spine, the ribs, the sternum, and even the collar bones is a chest isolations.  See, even though it might feel like you are move the front (breasts) the focus is on all the other things.  The back muscles help move the spine side to side allowing the ribs to slide from side to side over the hips.  The sternum floats to different places over the hips.  The collar bones stay level.  You can just also press your ribs forward and pull them back.  Your arms are out to the side or you can place your hands on your hips to help ensure there is no movement in the hips.  You can make your ribs move in circles.

With the side to side motion I used to reference a typewriter carriage.  Remember those?  They would slide to one side of the machine and kind of hang over then you would use the return arm to get it to slide back.  That is a GREAT visual and I actually see some people replicate it.  But then I see others in class who don’t even know what a typewriter is.  And if they do it was certainly the electric version that didn’t have a visible moving carriage with a return arm-dohicky.  So we just focus on the slide.

The chest isolations help keep you spine flexible and mobile.  It also helps you use those muscle that are inside, the intrinsic muscles.  The little ones that help with balance.  While you are doing the chest isolation movement you can focus on the and sense them.

Another way to isolate the chest is you can do a more front-back movement. If you are doing the front back portion of the move it is as if you are closing your chest and opening your back.  And then opening your chest and closing your back.  Arms can help. Bring your elbows back and draw them together to help open the chest and close the back.  Then bring them forward to open the back and close the chest.

This is one of those moves you can do anywhere.  You can do it in your car while you are stopped at a traffic light.  Don’t worry, other people don’t look up from their cell phones they will never notice you sliding your ribs around.  Enjoy the relaxed sensation and flexibility.

Are you familiar with chest isolations?  Do you do them in your current dance class?  Do you do them in your exercise program?

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Finger Flicks – A Nia 52 Moves

Posted by terrepruitt on February 3, 2015

I did not intend to write a blog post on all of the 52 Moves in Nia.  My intent was to post a few and entice you into buying The Nia Technique Book.  It seems as if I just might get to all of Nia’s 52 Moves on my blog.  It so happens that sometimes I am at a loss as to what to post, so I turn to a move on the list of 52 Moves.  Or sometimes I am intrigued by one the moves because it is in a routine that I am currently dancing with my students.  Or I am intrigued by of the moves that it is in a Nia Routine that I danced with another Nia teacher.  OR I am intrigued by of the moves even though it is NOT in a Nia Routine – as in, it is not part of the original choreography, but we do it anyway.  That is the fun thing about Nia Routines and the 52 Moves.  You can kind of put them in anywhere.  And, I will say it again, because I think it is important to state that the moves that Nia includes on their list are not unique to Nia.  Nia is not claiming to have created them.  Also, it is nice to know that you will experience moves in Nia that you have experienced before.  The moves are on the lists and included in Nia Routines because there are benefits to doing them.  Some of them are so simple the benefits could be overlooked.  Some of them might seem odd to have included on a list of moves done in a dance exercise class.  But they have benefits.  One move that is simple and might seem random to have in an exercise class is Finger Flicks.

Yeah, you read that right, Finger Flicks.  Flicking your fingers.  This move can be done so many different ways.  Fast, slow, high, low, fingers up, fingers down, with an emotion, without an emotion, with the music, against the music, so many possibilities.  The benefits of this move include conditioning the muscles of the forearms and hands.  If you really use your thumb to resist the fingers the move contracts the forearm muscles and makes your fingers work!  The Nia Technique Book states that this move helps rid the hands of tension.

The how-to is simple enough.  I bet you know it already.  You form a loose fist with your hand, keeping the thumb on the outside of the fingers.  Then push with all four fingers against the thumb.  Allow your thumb to resist.  Then let your fingers push through.  Practice this move with your hand at different levels-as in high above your shoulders, at the same level as your shoulder, below your shoulders.  Let your arms hang, hold them out . . . in other words flick your fingers all over.  Use one hand, then the other, then both.  Just flick, flick, flick, flick.  Try doing it how I mentioned, fast, slow, high, low, fingers up, fingers down, with an emotion, without an emotion, with the music, against the music,  play with the possibilities.

You can practice this move while dancing around your home.  You probably do this move without even thinking about it after washing your hands.  You could probably check the mirrors above the sink to verify it.

Are you familiar with finger flicks?

 

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Claw Hand – Nia’s 52 Moves

Posted by terrepruitt on January 20, 2015

As you may know if you have perused my blog or website, Nia has moves called the 52 Moves of Nia or Nia’s 52 Moves.  Moves concentrated and focused on.  Generally moves included in all of the routines.  Not all the moves are included in all of the routines, but the routines are jam-packed with most of the moves.  The moves on the list have physical benefits.  Some are fun or silly so they can have mental or spiritual benefits.  And in this case I am talking about your spirit or inner child, the part of you that likes to have fun, the part of you that you might not get to display in your regular everyday work life.  So not the religious type of spirit but the kind of spirit that you think of when you say or hear “school spirit” or inner child.  The fun playful side of you.  To me, one of those moves is Claw Hand.

Claw Hand is a great move.  It is super easy.  It can be done all on its own.  You can just stand or sit and do claw hand.  You can add it to some foot work.  You can add it to some complicated choreography.  You can make it soft or hard.  You can do it fast or slow.  It is very versatile.

You can even make noises when you do it.  You can growl like a big cat or a bear.  You can meow like a kitty-cat.  You can make any noise you want.  It is fun stuff.

As I said you can do it standing or sitting and this moves gets done in to all the stances and steps in the Nia Routines.  The Nia Technique Book (by Debbie and Carlos Rosas) recommends it be practiced in all the stances and steps.  And that is a great idea since we use it with all of them.  The routine I am doing now even add it to blocks.  We block in with claw hand and we block out with claw hand.  Why not?

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose,  Nia at the San Jose Community Centers, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex City of San Jose, San Jose Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, PiYoYou can probably figure out what this move is from the description but I tell you what the book says:

“Mimic a claw with your finger and claw the air, as if you were in a cat fight.  Keep your wrists relaxed, and sound a cat’s hisses as you do the move.  Use both hands.”

The benefits can include strengthening your fingers and hands.

In addition to keeping a relaxed wrist I like to use the claw shape to bring tension into my entire arm.  I imagine I am really clawing something.  I figure I would need strength to do that so I put my entire arm into it.  You can use one had to “claw” and the other hand to feel the muscles in your arm (forearm and upper arm) contract.

The book states that this move can increase your sense of power.  When I am doing it with muscles contracted as if I am REALLY clawing something I do have a sense of power.  I imagine that is how an animal feels when they wield their claw.

This move allows you to practice bending your fingers too.  That helps with the mobility of the joints.  I like this move.  I like to add sounding to it.

Ok, so stop and try it?  What sound do you like to do best with your Claw Hand?

 

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Ways To Practice Rock Around The Clock

Posted by terrepruitt on January 15, 2015

I have said it many, many times, but I am going to say it again.  Nia has 52 Moves which we incorporate into the Nia routines.  These moves have a specific way to be done.  But the way they are done is adjusted, like many things, when you are doing them in a routine.  There is or was a debate about one of the moves called the bow stance.  The debate is or was about how the weight of the body should be distributed. The reason I am saying “is or was” is because I don’t know if the debate was ever settled.  The discussion regarding it — at least one that I had seen — was on Facebook and it was a long discussion.  I don’t know what the end result was or what the “official” decree is because to me, I want to teach balance, so if I am JUST doing a bow stance then I would instruct people to have their weight evenly distributed.  Usually I am not doing JUST a bow stance.  If I am showing people the bow stance it is because it is in the routine and there are other steps prior to or after it and with other moves on either side the weight gets distributed according to the need.  So, in other words, we adjust the move to fit the dance and choreography.  So that is what my class and I are experiencing right now with the Nia 52 Move called Rock Around the Clock.

If you read my original post about it, the one that explains what it is, the instructions state to start the rock on the heels.  But in the routine I am leading my class through currently we start the rock on the toes.  Then we roll (or rock) to either the left or the right.  We actually go both ways and like many things, the different “sides” or directions are very different in regards to sensation and difficulty level.  One side is easier than the other . . . at least that is the consensus with my students.  So it is very beneficial to practice “rocking” both ways.

With this post I am doing two things; 1) I am reminding you to practice moves going both directions.  Just like we do both sides.  If we are doing a move with the left side we do it with the right.  We – trainers – often say to keep the body even and it really is to work both sides of the body AND the brain!  2)  Share with you a different or additional WAY to practice Rocking Around the Clock.

My original post says something about this being an example of an easy move.  It is not necessarily “easy”, what I probably should have said was the Rock Around the Clock was not a high intensity move.  So for those that are really starting out learning this move you might even want to sit down and do it.  Since feet are in shoes for a large part of the day and those shoes might not allow for a lot of ankle mobility, it could be that your ankles just don’t want to move in the way that is required with this move.  So it is a great idea to sit down and allow the ankles to loosen up.

For me, my feet want move opposite of each other.  So each foot wants to be on the opposite edge, so training my feet and my brain to be on the same edge it interesting.  Sitting in a chair while doing this move allows my feet and brain to understand that this move is “same edge”.  Once you get your feet and brain on the same page, then you can stand up.  (FYI:  Sitting and practicing this move is very different from trying to take pictures of your feet while sitting and practicing this move.  But hopefully you will get the idea from the pictures even though they are not very good.)

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When you are standing you can use something to hold onto like a counter, table, chair, wall, something that is sturdy and can assist you in balancing.  Having something to steady you while your feet get used to supporting your weight on the edges is nice.  The support also allows you to really exaggerate your foot movements to help get the movement into your muscle memory.

This move helps build strength in the ankles and the feet.  This is also a very “mental move”.  It is one of those moves you might have to really think about in order to do it correctly.  Then, with practice, it will become one of those moves you can do without thinking so much about.  And your feet and ankles will benefit greatly.

So have you tried it?  Can you do it sitting down?  Can you do it standing up?  Can you see how it is an interesting move?

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Head and Eye Movement In Nia

Posted by terrepruitt on July 31, 2014

One of Nia’s 52 Moves is Head and Eye Movement.  Yes, we intentionally and specifically move our head and our eyes in Nia.  A long time ago when I first started teaching I had a student who had come to about three classes and after the third class she said something to affect of since starting Nia she actually moves her head to look around while driving.  So my first thought was, “Yay!  Nia helps make people better drivers.”  If people are not moving their heads and then start doing so after Nia – YAY! – especially while driving.  Nia really is about full body health and movement.  So we don’t do just a cardio workout that works your heart.  We don’t do just a dance exercise that moves your legs.  We don’t do just some choreography that involves our hands.  We involve the whole body.  As you may have surmised from the post on Creepy Crawlers.  It is very important for people to move their heads.

I see a lot of people with very stiff necks who in fact do not move their heads.  There are a lot of reasons.  I know some reasons include stiff muscles.  They can’t move their head without pain because their muscles are not used to moving or are holding too much stress.  I know some people who can’t move their head because it causes them dizziness.  I also know some people who rid themselves of stiff necks and dizziness by moving their head.  Moving one’s head will not solve everyone’s issues of stiff necks or dizziness, but I do know some people who were helped by it.

In Nia we move our head a lot.  We engage our eyes a lot.  But as with all of the 52 Moves of Nia there is a specific way to do it.  In just practicing Head and Eye Movements you look all around and move your head to match your gaze.  Letting the action of your head follow the intent of your eyes.

Just like with Catching Flies, this move requires looking BEFORE moving.  So LOOK and then move the head so you are facing the direction you are looking.  As I said look in all directions.  Look up, then move your head so you are facing up.  Look down, then move your head so your chin is at your chest.  Look left, then turn your head left.  Look right, then turn your head to the right.  Look in a different direction then move your head so you are facing that direction.  After looking around nod your head “yes”, shake it “no”, roll the head around both directions.  Vary the speed at which you do all of this.  Be aware of any sensations that come up.  Also, if you are not accustomed to moving your head be careful that you don’t get dizzy or too dizzy.

As I mentioned some people get dizzy from lack of moving their head.  It is not because of any condition, it is just lack of practice.  So, be cautious when you first practice Nia’s Head and Eye Movement.  Now, go, look around, move your head.

How do you feel when you move your head?  Do you move your head around?  Do you have a stiff neck?  Do you get dizzy when you move your head?

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A Great Move In Nia’s 52 Moves

Posted by terrepruitt on July 19, 2014

One of Nia’s 52 Moves is a nice move.  It can be done easily, it can be used in almost any dance, and it has numerous benefits, but the name is one I get crawly skin saying.  I don’t like to say it.  It is worse than Creepy Crawlers.  When we do this move I often start out using the actual Nia name, but then explain how I would rather not and I would rather do something else.  The move is fantastic though because it has many uses, but the name.  I mean, what do you feel when I say, “Catching Flies“?  I prefer not to.

But the move itself is a great move and very important to keep our hands, arms, eyes, and brain active.  When we “Catch Flies” in Nia we open the hands then we make a loose fist to “catch” and hold the “flies.  Ewwww.  Just thinking about it . . . I mean . . . really thinking about it grosses me out.  Thank God, I don’t think too much about it when I am teaching.  I do think enough to change it.  There is one routine I teach where I change it to “catching your dreams”.  It goes along with the whole sequence of moves before and after.  So I will often start out with “catching flies” then change it to “catch your dreams”.

Part of the move is to LOOK before you grab.  So we are not just randomly grabbing in the air.  We are looking as if we really were going to catch a fly.  Since most of us are not like cats — do you know what I mean?  Have you ever been playing with a toy with a cat and they won’t even be looking and they just reach out their arm and snatch the toy out of thin air?  (Crazy!)  Most of us are not like that, we need to look.  So we LOOK before we grab at the “flies”.  We engage our eyes and our brain — THEN we grab.  We are also engaging our neck and spine because we are catching FLIES after all.  See, the image makes sense.  It is a “good” one, but an icky one. But since it is good and it makes sense, I will start out saying “catching flies” so people get the idea.  Then I can change it if I want.

I think I got catching fairies from another Nia class.  A Nia teacher said it and I was thrilled, so I use that one.  Sometimes I say catching joy.  Or perhaps grabbing some energy.  There are many things to say after the initial move is understood and the Nia name is announced.

The Nia Technique book explains the benefits very well:

Practicing Catching Flies increases brain activity.  This move neurologically connects your hands, your head, and your eyes, and engenders manual dexterity and speed.  Emotionally, you can use the is move to express aggression, determination, anger, frustrations, playfulness, and achievement.

I am sure you can use it to express a lot more emotions.  When we practice this move we add variety.  There can be fast flies, slow flies, they can be flying high, they can be flying low, they can be flying right in front of us, they can be flying behind us, you get the idea.  The flies can be all over so it can be quite and active move.

It is like the Locust pose in yoga — GREAT MOVE, not so great name.

What do you think?  Do you want to catch flies?  Would you rather catch fairies?  Would you rather catch joy?  Can you understand what a great move it is?

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Dead Bugs, Well, Actually, Creepy Crawlers

Posted by terrepruitt on March 11, 2014

In other forms of exercise I learned the dead bug.  Where you lie on your back and put your limbs up in the air as if you were a dead bug.  In Nia one of our 52 moves is called Creepy Crawlers.  I ALWAYS call it Creepy CrawlIES and sometimes I say, dead bugs. In Nia the move is part of the Upper Extremities in the Nia 52 moves, the hands to be exact.  It is where we turn our hands to allow the palms to face up and we wiggle our fingers.  Truly NOT a dead bug because dead bugs don’t wiggle there legs . . . in general.  I will work on calling it by the correct name Creepy CrawLERS.

This is a simple, simple move that provides great benefits.  I don’t know how often you are around the elderly if ever, but losing the use of their hands, losing the dexterity is a very common issue.  So as the Nia Technique Book says, “Practicing Creepy Crawlers helps your fingers, hands, and forearms remain strong, flexible, and agile.”  It is very important to move your hands.  And not all of the things we do in everyday life allows for that type of flexibility and agility.  So this move is so great.

To practice it according to the Nia Technique Book you just wiggle all of your fingers, including your thumb.  Keep the elbow bent which helps keep the shoulders and next relaxed.  Change palm directions.

This is one of those moves that is pretty much always teamed up with another move.  Usually we have a foot pattern while we do the Creepy Crawlers.  Or we are moving around the room.  Usually, but not always.  Sometimes it is nice to concentrate on the movement on the fingers.  Really wiggle them with intent.  Make certain ALL ten fingers are moving.  Notice how it affects the tendons in your hands and arms.  Watch the movement in your arms.

If you are constantly moving your fingers in a wiggly motion while doing choreography with your feet you are allowing that brain to work.  Most people understand that the brain needs to stay active . . . just like the body . . . in order to function well, so we consider it fun to get our brains going as part of our movement, as part of our dance.

So as with all of the Nia 52 Moves that I have explained.  Sometimes we do them a little different from perfect as described in the book.  Doing Creepy Crawlers in a routine might have us straightening our arms.  Or we might even be moving the hand all around while the fingers are wiggling.  But the point is the fingers.  Moving the fingers, wiggling the fingers.  Bending each and every joint in the finger.

This is also a really fun move to do with kids.  They love the idea of Creepy Crawlers, bug legs.  You know kids?  So many of them love anything to do with bugs.

So, I encourage you to do some Creepy Crawlers.  Especially if you work at a computer or do repetitive motions with your hands.  This will help keep them moving in different directions/ways.

So, did you try it?  See how easy it is?

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