Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch!

    Nia: Thurs at 9 am

    Yin Yoga: Mons at 11:30 am

    Gentle Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:30 am

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    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training!

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Posts Tagged ‘prostate cancer’

Turmeric – Flavor With Benefits

Posted by terrepruitt on April 12, 2012

When I wrote the post regarding anti-inflammatory foods, I decided to buy some Turmeric.  At the time I was not able to claim knowing what it tasted like.  I figured since it was used a lot in curries I would be ok with it.  I thought that it would be a good thing to add to our diet.  Since there are so many things that work as an inflammatory, I am always trying to add anti-inflammatory foods and ingredients into our diet.  I wasn’t sure exactly how to use it, but I was wanting to give it a go.  Turmeric has been used in food and as medicine for centuries.  Seems like the West is doing a lot of research to see what health benefits it has.

According to the University of Maryland Medical Center:  “Turmeric has been used in both Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory, to treat digestive and liver problems, skin diseases, and wounds.  Curcumin is also a powerful antioxidant.”

Remember Curcumin is the phytochemcial that give turmeric its color.

And Eat This! has a list of 20 Health Benefits contributed to Turmeric including;

-When combined with cauliflower, it has shown to prevent prostate cancer and stop the growth of existing prostate cancer.

-Has shown promise in slowing the progression of multiple sclerosis in mice.

-May aid in fat metabolism and help in weight management.

Well, I’ve had it for a while now and I really like the flavor.  I’ve added it to soups, to veggies, and to meat.  You know my standard ground turkey and whatever veggies I have?  Well, it really makes that taste wonderful.  I had cooked broccoli, mushrooms, and ground turkey for dinner a few nights ago, today I decided to have the leftovers in a tortilla.  Since we have a few cucumbers I decided to use some up by slicing it really thin and putting it in the tortilla with the meat and a bit of parmesan cheese.  WOW!  The turmeric and the cucumbers were a party-in-my-mouth flavor.  It was really good.  So now I am going to serve cucumbers with my turmeric ground turkey.  Many people can describe flavors, I can sometimes, but I cannot describe the flavor or turmeric.  I would say that it is somewhat mellow so it won’t necessary overpower what you are using it with.  It is not hot or bitter.  I think it can be used with anything savory.     
 
Dance Exercies, Nia, Nia Campbell, Campbell Nia, Nia classes in Campbell, evening Nia, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia,Wiki says “it has a distinctly earthy, slightly bitter, slightly hot peppery flavor and a mustardy smell” but I don’t agree.  Maybe I will give it the mustardy smell, but not off the top of my head.

But there is a problem with turmeric.  It dyes everything yellow!  I now have several bowls and utensils dyed yellow because I used them to stir, serve, or store something with turmeric in it.  It is just as bad as tomato sauce when it comes to dying things!

I am familiar with turmeric in its powdered form, but it is a root like ginger, so if you get it in root form you can use it just as you would ginger.  You could chop it, grate it, cut it up . . . the same as ginger. 

If you like the flavor it seems like a great thing to add to just about everything.   Since it is touted as an anti-inflammatory, an antioxidant, help in the treatment of  inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), helps treat the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, improves liver function, prevents some cancers, lowers cholesterol, helps treat and prevent Alzheimer’s, reduces risk of childhood Leukemia among other things — why not add it to things?

Do you cook with Turmeric?  If so what do you add it to?

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Cancer Is in ALL of Us

Posted by terrepruitt on September 11, 2010

Cancer is in all of us.  Could be why we all know someone affected by it.  We all have it in us.  Experts call it “cancer without disease”.  There are microscopic occurrences of cancer in all of us.  Our bodies fight it off, kill it, or just don’t allow it to grow, but it is there.  I watched Dr. Oz and learned some things I want to share.  There is a process in our bodies called angiogenesis, this is a awesome and necessary process, it is when new blood vessels are formed.  This is something that occurs when a wound is healing.  It also occurs as a catalyst for cancer.  When those cancer cells release chemicals causing new blood vessels to form that feed those cancerous cells or tumors that is when cancer becomes a problem.

There are ideas about fighting cancer before it becomes a problem.  Love that idea.  Let’s prevent and not have to deal with the result of the disease once the cells are out of control.  What the talk is about is “starving” the cancer – ANTI angiogenesis.  It is thought that there are foods that will assist with that.

The episode I watched talked about five foods that will help starve the cancer cells that may be/are present before they become an issue that has to be dealt with.  The guest Dr. said, “It’s not about Doctors and drugs, it is about you and what you eat”.  (Love that!)

The video on the site only has what I summed up for you (above), but I was taking notes so I could post it for you:

Five foods to assist with Anti-Angiogenesis:

1) Bok Choy
   A Chinese Cabbage.  (I don’t think I have ever had it.)
Dr. Li said it has brassinin which is believed to help fight cancer.  His advice was to eat 1/2 Cup three times a week.

2) Cooked Tomatoes
(I have heard this before, but I forgot.  I need to put it on my hubby’s plate.)
   Tomatoes have lycopene, but cooking them increases the availability by two times.  So COOKED tomatoes are what they recommend for preventing prostate cancer.  The recommendation is for a 1/2 cup serving 2 to 3 times a week.

3)  Flounder
    (I don’t like fish.)
    This is an omega three rich food and they say a 6 oz serving 3 times a week.

4) Strawberries
   (I don’t like strawberries either, do you know why?  The seeds.  And you know what?  That is where the good stuff is!)
   They indicated on the show that strawberries are believed to be an anti-angiogenesis food in addition to them being high in antioxidants and they said its the seeds.

5) Artichokes
   (I like artichokes, but with mayonnaise (which is not good in the amount needed to eat an artichoke) and I am not a fan of the hearts—and you guessed it that is where the good stuff is.)
   They compared it to milk thistle and said the artichoke is a flower, the show also recommended a “per day” intake of the artichoke, he said 1/2 cup per day.

Some of these suggestions I’ve heard of, some of them are new to me.  I’ve also heard before that cancer is in all of us, but I hadn’t heard about angiogenesis and therefore I hadn’t heard of ANTI-angiogenesis.  It found it interesting.  I wanted to share.  I think I’ll try some Bok Choy next week and make certain that I get tomatoes on our plates.  I’ll hold off on the fish.  What about you?  Do you eat these foods?  Might you start?  How do you cook Bok Choy?

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments »

Broccoli – An Amazing Food

Posted by terrepruitt on June 15, 2010

Broccoli is one of those vegetables that can be eaten raw or cooked.  When eaten raw people sometimes smother it in dip. While that does not take away from the nutrients of the broccoli itself it somewhat might help in defeating the purpose of eating healthy.  But that is fodder for another post.

A common way to cook broccoli is to steam it or boil it. One way to easily steam it is to stand the crowns up like little trees in a dish of shallow water and microwave it for a few seconds.  It depends on how much you want it cooked.  The less cooked better preserves the nutrients.  Boiling it might cook away some of the amazing nutrients that have been attributed to broccoli.

The amazing part of the nutrients of broccoli is that is has so many.  It is high in vitamin C, K, A, and is high in fiber.  It is believed to have anti cancer properties, such as sulforaphane and indoles which are phytonutrients.  This are nutrients found in plants that are thought to be nutrients that might help keep our bodies in check and in balance and not contribute to cancer.

Broccoli has been found to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

It might not smell pleasant while cooking it or after, but that is the sulfur that you smell.

1 cup of steamed broccoli has:

—over 100% of the Daily Value of vitamins C and K
—45% of the Daily Value of vitamin A
—20% of the Daily Value of dietary fiber
—15% of the Daily Value of potassium
—10% of the Daily Value of magnesium
—almost 10% of the Daily Value of protein and calcium

Broccoli has more vitamin C than an orange and more calcium than a glass of milk.  It really is a wonder vegetable.  Remember frozen CAN be just as good as “fresh”.

Broccoli has been found to help prevent heart disease.

Broccoli.  Are you a fan?  How do you eat yours?

Posted in Food, Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , | 10 Comments »