Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

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Mushrooms – Not a Superfood, But Super Good

Posted by terrepruitt on February 28, 2012

My family has always eaten mushrooms.  I have not.  I remember a time when I didn’t like them.  I remember that I started liking them. Not too long after I started liking them, my grandfather, who was the one that cooked them how I liked them, starting his bizarre food behaviors.  The way he cooked the mushrooms by which I started liking them was sauteing them with browned butter and a ton of garlic.  Then he started adding all types of things, things that might not actually belong mixed together.  But my grandfather’s decline is not the subject of this post.  Neither is the fact that he was the one that introduced me to mushrooms.  The subject of this post is mushrooms.  There was a time and I mentioned it before in my Some Foods Can Boost Your Immune System post, when mushrooms were not thought to have much nutritional value.  In fact, I remember my mother and I talking about that.  We had thought that mushrooms were pretty much nationally void.  But now-a-days that is not the case.  Mushrooms are not a superfood, but they do have nutritional value.

Mushrooms are a fungus.  There are many kind, I know, but I am talking about the plain white variety.  The ones that really go with almost anything savory.  I mean the other kind are good, but some of them have a very strong flavor so they might drown out a delicate sauce or flavor.  But the white ones are pretty plain, so you can make them any flavor you’d like — pretty much.  At the same time receive their nutritional benefits.

Mushrooms can be eaten raw or cooked.  When I eat them raw it is usually in a salad or in as part of a veggie tray with dip.  Oh, we also do use them as a dipper when eating cheese fondue.

ance Exercies, Nia, Nia Campbell, Campbell Nia, Nia classes in Campbell, evening Nia, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia,Per the USDA Nutrient Database the nutritional value for about 3.5 oz of mushrooms is:

about 27 Calories

Carbohydrates 4.1 g

Fat 0.1 g

Protein 2.5 g

Thiamine (vit. B1)  0.1 mg (9%)

Riboflavin (vit. B2) 0.5 mg (42%)

Niacin (vit. B3) 3.8 mg (25%)

Pantothenic acid (B5) 1.5 mg (30%)

Vitamin C 0 mg (0%)

Calcium 18 mg (2%)

Phosphorus 120 mg (17%)

Potassium 448 mg (10%)

Sodium 6 mg (0%)

Zinc 1.1 mg (12%)

So with that information we can see there is a good amount vitamin B in mushrooms.  It seems that mushrooms can be forced to make vitamin D.  The process can be compared to how we convert sunshine on our skin to vitamin D.  Mushrooms have a chemical called ergosterol, which, when exposed to UV light is converted to vitamin D.

Wiki states:  “Testing conducted by the Pennsylvania State University showed an hour of UV light exposure made a serving of mushrooms contain twice the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s daily recommendation of vitamin D. Testing by the Monterey Mushrooms Company demonstrated 5 minutes of UV light exposure made a serving of mushrooms contain four times the FDA’s daily recommendation of vitamin D.”

Which is funny to me because I thought mushrooms preferred dark.

On Fresh Mushrooms their antioxidant contents is cited.  Antioxidants are good for the immune system.  They help protect the cells from damage from free radical, which are thought to be the cause of many diseases.  Mushrooms contain the antioxidant Ergothioneine and the mineral Selenium which works as an antioxidant.

I love mushrooms.  I am happy that they are more than just good tasting, they are good for me.  We eat a lot of mushrooms.  Do you?  How many times a week would you say you have mushrooms?  How do you prepare them?  Do you eat them raw or do you cook them?

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