Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch!

    Nia: Thurs at 9 am

    Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:30 am

    Please see my website for details! I sub for the City of San Jose and the YMCA so check my website for dates and times!

    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training!

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • My Bloggey Past

  • ******

    Chose a month above to visit archives, or click below to visit a page.

Posts Tagged ‘cruciferous vegetable’

Cauliflower Flavorless But Good

Posted by terrepruitt on March 23, 2016

Cauliflower is a cruciferous vegetable, meaning it is “of, relating to, or denoting plants of the cabbage family (Brassicaceae, formerly Cruciferae)” according to Google.  It is of the same species as kale, broccoli, cabbage, collard greens, and brussels sprouts and in the same family as daikon, arugula, rutabaga, and bok choy, to name a few.  It is also consider an anti-inflammatory which is good because many of the (overly) processed foods we eat are consider inflammatory.  And scientist are linking chronic inflammation with a whole list of diseases and ailments.  So, I am all for foods that will help with inflammation.  Although, I am not really a fan of cauliflower.  I don’t grab it off of a veggie tray at potlucks.  I don’t put it on my plate when it is offered as a cooked side.  I am not a fan.  Because I am not a fan I do want to try the myriad of recipes that include it and make it the star.  Like the cauliflower pizza crust or the version of macaroni and cheese made with cauliflower or the many recipes that used riced cauliflower.  I will get to some of those one of these days.  But first a little about cauliflower.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, PiYo, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFitTo me it is pretty tasteless.  It has no flavor really.  Not that I can remember . . . but then again I can’t remember the last time I ate just cauliflower.  I have cooked it and used it in this yummy stuffed portobello recipe.  It is one of those vegetables that can add substance but not really flavor.  That is probably why it goes so well as the base for some many things . . . you can make it taste like anything because it tastes like nothing.

But in addition to it being an anti-inflammatory it has a very low Glycemic Index.  The GI as you may know affects our blood sugar so  food low on the index help with keeping the blood sugar level even.  Also, it is high in vitamin C, giving you 75% of the DV% in a cup.  It also contains vitamin K, folate, pantothenic acid, vitamins B6, B2, B1, and B3.  Also fiber, potassium, and protein.

It also comes in different colors.  There is white, orange, and purple.  There is green cauliflower with the normal  shape and the Romanesco Broccoli or Italian cauliflower kind.  I’ve had that before.  I roasted it (surprise!) and it was kind of sweet.  The texture was odd.

Recently my friend posted something about cauliflower on Facebook.  She had recently made a recipe that she had to explain to her child.  It got me curious and I ended up making it . . . hence the post on cauliflower.  I am in love with this recipe and it has cauliflower in it.  It is a really yummy way to eat cauliflower.  But I will save the recipe for another post.

For now you can tell me:  Do you like cauliflower?  How do you eat it?  Do you eat it raw?  Do you cook it?  How?  Have you tried any of those recipes like the cauliflower pizza crust?

 

Posted in Food, Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Baby Bok Choy – Oh Joy!

Posted by terrepruitt on September 17, 2011

I am in love. I first mentioned bok choy on my blog when I was talking about foods that Dr. Oz thinks will help prevent cancer.  When I first mentioned it I thought I had never had it, but some commentors pointed out that I more than likely had it in Chinese food. Yeah, they, of course, were correct.  I really like baby bok choy in my soup.  I thought it would make a good substitution for green garlic. I thought it was more like an onion.  The other day I decided to buy some and add it to a chicken dish I had made. Oh my.

The baby bok choy added such a great flavor I wondered if I would like it sautéed by itself. So I cooked some up last night. I had faith I would like it. So much faith that I made my hubby collard greens, which he loves, so I wouldn’t have to share my baby bok choy. Oh my. It taste like butter. As I was eating it I kept thinking “butter”. So I wanted to verify that. So I sacrificed a bite to hubby. I said, “Does that taste like butter?” He agreed. I told him I didn’t put any butter in it and he said if he didn’t know better he would have said I was lying.

To cook it, I cut the ends off the top green portion and chopped them up, then after they are cooked tender I throw in the chopped green portion and cook them a bit. My cooking method is to saute it in garlic olive oil, with some onions and garlic salt – yeah, my norm.

I am convinced that boy choy does not taste the same although I have not tried it I just have experienced baby versions of veggies are different than “adult” versions. So I am sticking to the baby bok choy.

I forgot it was considered a cabbage.  I was just reminded that I had heard that because I wrote it in my Dr. Oz post.  But I don’t understand the classifications of fruits and veggies, so I am not surprised that I didn’t know it was considered a cabbage and then forgot it was considered a cabbage shortly after I learned it.   I do not think of cabbage as “stalky”.  I think of cabbage as a round head.  But . . . bok choy is considered a cabbage.  According to The Cook’s Thesaurus:

“bok choy = Chinese chard = Chinese white cabbage = Chinese cabbage = Chinese
mustard cabbage = pak choy = pak choi = baak choi = white mustard cabbage =
white celery mustard = taisai = bai cai”  and “bok choy sum = Canton bok choy”

I could not find specific nutrition information on BABY bok choy but WebMD said:

Per 1 cup:  Bok Choy Cooked

Calories                   20
Fiber                         3
Vitamin A              62%
Vitamin B-2           10%
Vitamin B-6           22%
Vitamin C               59%
Folic Acid               17%
Magnesium              6%
Potassium              18%
Omega-3s         100 mg

dance exercise, Nia teacher, Nia class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, helpyouwell.com

It is a cruciferous vegetable.  Which family “takes its alternate name (Cruciferae, New Latin for “cross-bearing”) from the shape of their flowers, whose four petals resemble a cross,” according to Wiki.  Cruciferous vegetables have a lot of phytochemicals which are thought to have anti-cancer properties.  Could be that they also contain a lot of vitamins and minerals and are not short on delivering dietary fiber.  All of which I think contribute to health.

I really believe that baby bok choy is a vegetable that people who do not like vegetables could use as a “gateway vegetable”.  🙂  They could eat it allowing them to get used to the idea of vegetables and it could help start them on the path of eating vegetables.

What about you, do you like bok choy?  Have you tried baby bok choy?  I have a feeling that you will see more post about baby bok choy as I experiment with cooking it and eating it.

Posted in Food, Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »