Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch! SIX group classes a week!

    Nia: Tues and Thurs at 9 am

    Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:15 am

    Please see my website for details! I sub for the City of San Jose and the YMCA so check my website for dates and times!

    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training!

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  • My Bloggey Past

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Posts Tagged ‘anti cancer’

Kale – Sounds As If It Should Be A Superfood

Posted by terrepruitt on January 19, 2012

After a I teach Nia I am sweaty and going from a somewhat warm studio to the cold when you are wet is not fun. After Nia class yesterday I was so cold I just wanted to go straight home, but I had one stop to make in Willow Glen. But after that I had planned on jumping on the freeway and going straight home. Sometimes getting off the freeway at our exit is difficult. The most direct route requires one to go from the exit ramp across three to four lanes of a sometimes busy street. Most of the time I can safely move across to the turn lane, but every once in a while it is too trafficky and I don’t believe I should stop the people behind me on the ramp NOR the people driving on the street I am going to cross just because I want to make a left hand turn. I don’t believe in endangering others to make it easier on myself. So sometimes I just stay in the most right lane and drive through the light instead of turning left. Then I take a round about way home. But I get there just the same and I don’t stress other drivers or myself. Well, this happened yesterday when I was freezing and just wanted to get home. As I was deciding on my round about way home I realized I might as well just go to the grocery store since I was on that road already. We could always use fresh veggies so I decided to get some.

Nia teacher, dance exercise, Nia class, Nia, San Jose Nia, Nia San JoseWhile I was in the store a woman started talking to me about eggplant. She said it was too difficult to cook so when her neighbors gives it to her she just throws it away. For on brief moment I considered asking her if I could give her my phone number and she could call me and I would take it! Then we started talking about some of the other vegetables that were in the same area. She was saying collard greens are good for you. I told her that my husband loves them. She asked me how I cooked them and I told her I sautéed them. She said she fried them, the same as the eggplant. While we were talking I noticed the Kale. I always forget about kale. I was happy that we were talking and it allowed me to focus for a moment on the kale. I bought some.

Kale is part of the cabbage family. It is just leaves. Kale is part of the family of vegetables that are called cruciferous vegetables. Some other cruciferous vegetables are broccoli, collard greens, cabbage, brussels sprouts, and cauliflower.

You know how I don’t understand plant species and families and all that. But more and more research is providing information that these types of vegetables are very good for us in regards to nutrients we need.

As much as we all know to take the governmental daily values with a grain of salt, a cup of kale has over 1300% of the daily value of vitamin K, over 350% of vitamin A, and over 80% of vitamin C. It also contains calcium and beta carotene. Research has shown that kale is rich in antioxidant, is an anti-inflammatory, and has properties that are thought to be of the anti-cancer nature. Steamed kale is thought to have cholesterol-lowering benefits.

According to Wiki: Kale freezes well and actually tastes sweeter and more flavourful after being exposed to a frost. I, myself, am going to try to make the oh-so-talked-about-you-have-probably-heard-about-them kale chips. In fact I could swear that one of you — one of you that I read your blog — posted about kale chips, but I can’t remember who. I went looking but I couldn’t find the post.

Anyway . . . do you eat kale? If you do how do you eat it? I am going to go experiment right now!

Posted in Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

Baby Bok Choy – Oh Joy!

Posted by terrepruitt on September 17, 2011

I am in love. I first mentioned bok choy on my blog when I was talking about foods that Dr. Oz thinks will help prevent cancer.  When I first mentioned it I thought I had never had it, but some commentors pointed out that I more than likely had it in Chinese food. Yeah, they, of course, were correct.  I really like baby bok choy in my soup.  I thought it would make a good substitution for green garlic. I thought it was more like an onion.  The other day I decided to buy some and add it to a chicken dish I had made. Oh my.

The baby bok choy added such a great flavor I wondered if I would like it sautéed by itself. So I cooked some up last night. I had faith I would like it. So much faith that I made my hubby collard greens, which he loves, so I wouldn’t have to share my baby bok choy. Oh my. It taste like butter. As I was eating it I kept thinking “butter”. So I wanted to verify that. So I sacrificed a bite to hubby. I said, “Does that taste like butter?” He agreed. I told him I didn’t put any butter in it and he said if he didn’t know better he would have said I was lying.

To cook it, I cut the ends off the top green portion and chopped them up, then after they are cooked tender I throw in the chopped green portion and cook them a bit. My cooking method is to saute it in garlic olive oil, with some onions and garlic salt – yeah, my norm.

I am convinced that boy choy does not taste the same although I have not tried it I just have experienced baby versions of veggies are different than “adult” versions. So I am sticking to the baby bok choy.

I forgot it was considered a cabbage.  I was just reminded that I had heard that because I wrote it in my Dr. Oz post.  But I don’t understand the classifications of fruits and veggies, so I am not surprised that I didn’t know it was considered a cabbage and then forgot it was considered a cabbage shortly after I learned it.   I do not think of cabbage as “stalky”.  I think of cabbage as a round head.  But . . . bok choy is considered a cabbage.  According to The Cook’s Thesaurus:

“bok choy = Chinese chard = Chinese white cabbage = Chinese cabbage = Chinese
mustard cabbage = pak choy = pak choi = baak choi = white mustard cabbage =
white celery mustard = taisai = bai cai”  and “bok choy sum = Canton bok choy”

I could not find specific nutrition information on BABY bok choy but WebMD said:

Per 1 cup:  Bok Choy Cooked

Calories                   20
Fiber                         3
Vitamin A              62%
Vitamin B-2           10%
Vitamin B-6           22%
Vitamin C               59%
Folic Acid               17%
Magnesium              6%
Potassium              18%
Omega-3s         100 mg

dance exercise, Nia teacher, Nia class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, helpyouwell.com

It is a cruciferous vegetable.  Which family “takes its alternate name (Cruciferae, New Latin for “cross-bearing”) from the shape of their flowers, whose four petals resemble a cross,” according to Wiki.  Cruciferous vegetables have a lot of phytochemicals which are thought to have anti-cancer properties.  Could be that they also contain a lot of vitamins and minerals and are not short on delivering dietary fiber.  All of which I think contribute to health.

I really believe that baby bok choy is a vegetable that people who do not like vegetables could use as a “gateway vegetable”.  🙂  They could eat it allowing them to get used to the idea of vegetables and it could help start them on the path of eating vegetables.

What about you, do you like bok choy?  Have you tried baby bok choy?  I have a feeling that you will see more post about baby bok choy as I experiment with cooking it and eating it.

Posted in Food, Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Purple Potatoes

Posted by terrepruitt on January 18, 2011

The Prime Rib potluck had purple potatoes.  The hostess made purple potatoes or maybe they were blue.  She roasted yellow and purple fingerling potatoes.  I have seen purple potatoes in the store, but not purple fingerlings.  I have never had a purple potato.  The way they were cooked was incredible—they were perfect.  The seasoning was perfect and they way they were cooked was perfect.  The purple ones did not taste different from the regular ones.  But they were so pretty.  I was mesmerized by the deep purple color. There is an idea out there that it is important to eat the color of the rainbow.  There is a lot of nutrients in the different colors of fruits and vegetables.  Research is proving that there are antioxidants found in the different colors.

Anthocyanin is responsible for the purple and blue colors of fruits and vegetables.  This particular flavonoid is proving to have anti-cancer and heart-protective effects.  Research is also discovering this antioxidant has benefits shown to boost the immune system and protect against age-related memory loss.

Potatoes with the darkest color are proving to have almost four times the amount of antioxidants . . . AND they hold up to 75% of their nutrients after being cooked.  As you know a lot of vegetables lose a large amount of their nutrients when cooked.

According to the USDA’s website: “All potatoes are a good source of complex carbohydrates, potassium, vitamin C, folic acid, and iron.”  So with the purple variety you would be getting all of that plus the added benefits of antioxidants.  PLUS . . . you can’t overlook the beautiful color they add to any plate!

Have you had a purple potato?

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »