Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch!

    Nia: Thurs at 9 am

    Yin Yoga: Mons at 11:30 am

    Gentle Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:30 am

    Please see my website for details! I sub for the City of San Jose and the YMCA so check my website for dates and times!

    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training!

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Posts Tagged ‘vitamin K’

Chayote Part Three

Posted by terrepruitt on November 4, 2019

The internet says that chayote has a lot of benefits.  I am thinking a skin exfoliator may be one of them.  The condition my fingers were in after handling it was not good.  Took off a layer of skin.  Plus it left a sticky thick residue on my counter – AFTER I washed it off.  I had to use a scrubber to get it off.  I also washed my cutting board then stuck it in the dishwasher and it came out with that stuff still on it.  I had to scrape it off with a knife.  All of this really has me curious as to what it does INSIDE a body.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFit, City of San Jose Exercise Classes, Cambrian Yoga & Cardio Dance, CYCD, Yin YogaAnyway . . . the information I found on the internet says that chayote has protein, fiber, calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc, Copper, vitamin C, vitamin B9, and vitamin K.  Information also reports that it contains antioxidants. The antioxidants quercetin, myricetin, morin, and kaempferol.  Antioxidants may help protect cells from damage caused by free radicals.  Chayote may also help with heart health by lowering high blood pressure and high cholesterol, and improving poor blood flow – all things associated with risk factors of heart disease.

The Healthline article continues on to state that chayote may help may help regulate blood sugar levels because of the fiber.  The fiber might also help promote a healthy weight.  The fiber and flavonoids might help with digestive tract health. Also going back to some of the nutrients:  the vitamin B9 might help with pregnancy and the vitamin C (antioxidant) might help fight aging.  Some research showed that compounds in chayote might reduce the risks of some types of cancer and slow the progression of others.  Test also suggested that the extract might help protect against fatty liver disease.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFit, City of San Jose Exercise Classes, Cambrian Yoga & Cardio Dance, CYCD, Yin YogaWith all the suggested benefits, chayote sounds like a great addition to one’s diet.  As with so many food items there needs to be more research done.  All the studies are based on elements of the fruit and only go as far as what science knows at this time.  And, as with all things different people reap different benefits.

Additional information I saw is that is it also called a mirliton squash – there is that word again. I was introduced to it as it being a common food in Mexican cuisine, but the information I saw did mention it being used in Asian cooking. Again, I was just excited because it was new to me. I understand that it is not exciting to some people because they have been eating it all of their lives. And just like years ago when I received baby bok choy in my produce box I hadn’t really thought about how I probably HAD eaten it before in Chinese Food. Could be the same with chayote. I know there has been some things I couldn’t identify before in my chow mien so that could be it.

Not everything I get excited about and share is new to everyone, but sometimes it might be. I am just hear trying to let people know about new things (maybe new to them, maybe not) and share when I discover (or am given) something new.

Now that I know I need to wear gloves when prepping this fruit, I would cook it and eat it again . . . it has a lot going for it!

What do you think?

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Cilantro Has Some Good Stuff

Posted by terrepruitt on June 18, 2013

I used to not like cilantro.  Or at least I thought I didn’t like it.  Funny how that happens, isn’t it?  I really thought I didn’t like it then one night I was at someone’s house and they had made a salad . . . a BEAN salad at that and I tried some and I liked it.  I don’t like beans and I don’t like cilantro and I don’t normally eat onions . . . . .well, that is what I would have said all that time, many months ago.  When I tried the salad I decided that I did like beans and cilantro, but only in that particular salad.  I figured it was the combination of all of the ingredients that made it acceptable.  You might have read in some of my other posts though that I will eat kidney beans in a recipe I make called Red Beans and Rice.  It is NOT the typical Red Beans and Rice recipe, click here to see.  Since I do make the bean salad recipe I find myself with left over cilantro.  And since I have discovered I like it, I put it in my green salad.  It is a nice addition to the salad to give it a different flavor.  I actually haven’t tried it in anything else I can think of.  It seems like people either LOVE cilantro or HATE it.  I like it.  I don’t LOVE it, but it is a nice change of flavor. Today while I was making the Bean Salad I decided to give a look at what cilantro has to offer.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, ZumbaFirst of all cilantro is the leaves of the coriander plant.  Coriander is the little round pellet type seasoning.  Wiki states that all parts of the plant are edible, but it is the leaves and the dried seeds that are most commonly used.  That is cilantro and coriander.  Also, “the leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, fresh coriander, Chinese parsley, or cilantro (particularly in North America).”

Cilantro contains antioxidants.  Coriander does too, but the leaves were found to have a stronger effect.

According an article on the Global Healing Center’s website, consuming large amounts of cilantro regularly can help clear the body of toxic metals.

Cilantro contains potassium, calcium, manganese, iron, and magnesium.  It also has many vitamins including vitamin C, vitamin A, and vitamin K. The website Power Your Diet states that there is 30% of the daily recommended amount of vitamin C, about 225% of the daily recommended amount of vitamin A, and about 258% of the daily recommended amount of vitamin K, but in 100 grams.  That seems like a lot of cilantro to eat.  When I put it in my green salads or bean salad I don’t think I put but a small fraction of that.  I think I put about a cup of cilantro in the bean salad today, but I don’t think it weighed near 100 grams.  I still think that health benefits can be received.  I don’t really need 200% of any recommend value.

I believe herbs are a good way to both flavor our food and get nutrients we need to assist our bodies in being healthy.  Do you like cilantro?  Do you cook with it?  

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Leeks Are Awesome

Posted by terrepruitt on February 16, 2012

If you’ve read a few of my “recipes” you have probably figured out one of my go-to meals is ground turkey.  It is so easy to cook with and to make into almost anything, using any flavor.  I cook it with whatever vegetable I have around or new one I want to experiment with.  I usually start by sauteing an onion then I add food accordingly.  I find that most of the time I need to cook at least one of the veggies first.  I feel some vegetables need to be cooked more than turkey, like mushrooms.  But broccoli is one that gets added when the turkey is almost cooked.  My latest veggie to add to my turkey is a leek.  I was in Campbell this weekend signing the studio contract where I am going to have my new evening Nia Class and the city of Campbell has a great farmer’s market.  While I was walking down the aisle I saw leeks and I thought, “I should add that to the turkey.”  So I bought one.  I have never cooked with a leek before.  I was thinking I would saute a little bit of onion then put the leek in then saute it then add the turkey.  But when I chopped up the leek it smelled so onion-y I decided I didn’t need to use an onion.  I mean leeks do belong to the same family as onion and garlic.  After cooking the turkey until it was almost done, I added some broccoli.  When the broccoli was almost done I added a couple of tablespoons of whipped cream cheese with chives.  The leeks have such a great flavor I loved them.  I am going to cook with them more often.

According to WHFoods vegetables in the same family as leeks, such as onions and garlic supply their nutrients better if they sit for about 5 minutes after cutting before cooking.  Furthermore since they all belong to the same family leeks have many of the same health benefits.

Leeks have a lot (over 50% of the daily value) vitamin K.  They also have a large quantity of vitamin A. They contain vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), and vitamin B9 (folic acid). They also have a flavanoid shown in research to help protect our blood vessel linings from damage.  Leeks also contain compouds that convert to allicin and this has been shown to help relax blood vessels by producing of nitric oxide (NO).  With all this good stuff they do for our blood vessels it seems logical they will add to cardiovascular health.

Since leeks are so onion-y for me it will be easy to include them in our diet either cooked right into our food to add an additional layer of flavor and nutrition or even chopped and raw.  We can add them to our kale salads or throw them in with our quinoa.  I am definitely going to add them in my soups.  I think the more vegetables I add to our soups the better.

I really was impressed with the flavor that the leeks add to this dish.  I thought they were amazing!

(I took this picture to post to Streamzoo just to show our dinner fixings.  I didn’t know I was going to post about leeks until I tasted them and loved them.  the leeks are the green things chopped up on the right.)

Do you include leeks in your diet?  How?  Do you cook them?  Do you eat them raw?

Posted in "Recipes", Food, Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments »