Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach yoga, Nia, and stretch online!

    ALL CLASSES ARE ON ZOOM AT 10:00 AM PDT

    Tuesday Gentle Yoga 

    Wednesday Nia

    Thursday Stretch

    Please see my website for details!

    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training all virtual, of course!

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • My Bloggey Past

  • ******

    Chose a month above to visit archives, or click below to visit a page.

Posts Tagged ‘good fiber’

Beef A Top A Squash

Posted by terrepruitt on June 7, 2014

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Zumba, PiYo, Gentle YogaAnother quick post.  I often have a vague idea of what I am going to cook for dinner then I forget as the day goes on.  Either I am teaching Nia, learning a Nia routine, or at the moment going through my mom’s stuff.  So I find myself walking into the kitchen and not knowing what to cook.  Yesterday I was on the phone with my husband and it was already past starting-dinner-time and I didn’t even know what to make.  I had purchased some ground beef but had no plan as to what to do with it and I had forgotten about it.  When I looked in the fridge I saw it and the butternut squash I bought.  Ooo!  Stuffed squash.  Actually it is more like Topped Squash.  It is somewhat easy . . . except for making space in squash.  I was trying to do it in a manner that saved the squash innards for roasting (perhaps you will notice the cut up pieces of squash in the picture).  That was the difficult part.  Needing so much concentration I forgot to take pictures.  I emptied out the small portion where the seeds are (easy), but I wanted more room for meat (not so easy).  So I cooked then cut (I would not recommend that).  I would recommend just skipping that part and making room using a spoon before baking it.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Zumba, PiYo, Gentle Yoga______________________

Beef Topped Butternut Squash

1 butternut squash
olive oil
1/4 of an onion, chopped
1 lb of beef
2 cloves garlic, minced
salt
pepper
1 cup of shredded cheese

Preheat oven to 450° F.  Cut the butternut squash in half lengthwise.  Remove the seeds and enough of the insides to make a “boat” in which to place the beef.  Coat both sides of each half in olive oil.  Salt both sides of each half.  Place each half face down on parchment paper on pan.  Bake for 15 minutes.

While the squash is roasting, heat the oil and onion.  Once the onion is translucent, add the beef.  Add the salt and garlic.  Cook the beef until it is almost completely cooked.  Add the pepper.

When the first 15 minutes are done, turn the squash over and bake for another 15 minutes, salting again, at this time, if that is your preference.  After the second 15 minutes of cooking . . . . check the squash.  If it seems cooked all the way through, salt it again and then fill each half with the beef and top with shredded cheese.  Bake until the cheese is melted.

This is very rich and very filling.

______________________

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Zumba, PiYo, Gentle Yoga

 

I didn’t think about how much this was like the stuffed pumpkin I once cooked.  Although the stuffed pumpkin was much more “complicated”, as in it had more ingredients and a bit more complex flavors.  This was very good, I thought.  And since we usually eat ground turkey and not ground beef that much this was very rich.  I feel that beef is more “rich” than turkey.  It was very good.  And, had I not been trying to save the portion of squash that needs to come out to make room for the meat it would have been easy.  So if you are not interested in making nice chunks of squash to roast along side the halves this is an easy recipe.  And very yummy and rich.  Good dietary fiber!

Do you like stuff/topped squash?  What would you top yours with?

Posted in "Recipes", Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Almonds – Nutritious, But Questionable If They Are From California

Posted by terrepruitt on February 4, 2012

My last non-Nia post was about appetite suppressants, natural kinds.  The first thing I listed was almonds.  As always when I post something, even if I get the idea from somewhere else I like to look up facts for myself.  I feel better if there are a few sources confirming what I post about.  Often in my fact finding/confirming search I find other things, maybe other things entirely or other facts.

First of all the almond is a seed and not a nut.  Always makes me laugh when I learn stuff like this because all my life I thought of it as a nut . . . still do.  Almonds have a lot of fat, with 15 grams of fat per ounce, that is 23% of the Daily Value.  But it is the monounsaturated fat, the kind that we need, but still not too much.

Per ounce they have about three grams a fiber.  I think they are a nice addition to fiber you are already eating but should not be the only source as you would need to eat almost 4 ounces to get 10 grams of fiber.  That would be 60 grams of fat. 

Studies have shown almonds to help in lowering cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease.  Almonds seems to have the ability to help keep blood sugar even which can help reduce the risk of diabetes.  They contain vitamin E which is an antioxidant.  The magnesium and potassium help with blood flow and blood pressure.  Almonds are naturally gluten free.

Nutrient Values of Almonds:  Single Serving (1 ounce)
Calories—–170.0 
Protein—–6.0 g   Daily Value—–12%
Carbohydrate—–6.0 g Daily Value—–2%
Fat—–15.0 g Daily Value—–23%
  
Fats  
Cholesterol 0.000 mg Daily Value—–0%
Saturated Fat 1.5 g Daily Value—–8%
Mono Fat 10.0 g 
Poly Fat 3.0 g 
  
Carbohydrates  
Dietary Fiber 3.0 g Daily Value—–12%
  
Vitamins  
Vitamin E 10.0 IU Daily Value—–35%
Riboflavin 0.22 mg Daily Value—–4%
Niacin 0.95 mg Daily Value—–4%
Vitamin B6 0.03 mg Daily Value—–2%
Folate 17.0 mcg Daily Value—–4%
  
Minerals  
Potassium 207.0 mg Daily Value—–6%
Iron 1.0 mg Daily Value—–6%
Calcium 75.0 mg Daily Value—–8%
Magnesium 84.0 mg Daily Value—–20%
Phosphorous 147.0 mg Daily Value—–14%
Zinc 1.0 mg Daily Value—–6%
Copper 0.27 mg Daily Value—–14%
From  Nutfarm 

According to Wiki, there are no truly RAW almonds grown in and sold from California:

Because of two cases of salmonellosis traced to almonds in 2001 and 2004, the Almond Board of California proposed rules in 2006 regarding pasteurization of almonds available to the public, and the USDA approved them. The almond pasteurization program became mandatory for the California industry on September 1, 2007, and was implemented voluntarily over the previous two years.  Since September 1, 2007, raw untreated California almonds have technically not been available in the United States. Controversially, California almonds labeled as “raw” are required to be steam-pasteurized or chemically treated with propylene oxide. This does not apply to imported almonds, or to almonds sold from the grower directly to the consumer in small quantities.  Nor is the treatment required for raw almonds sold as exports to countries outside of North America.

I found the fact that California Almonds sold as “raw” are not really raw to be very interesting.  Hmmmm.  So much of what food labels say is untrue and deceitful.  I don’t know why I was surprised.

So in case you are wondering what “propylene oxide” is besides just the chemical that California Almonds are treated with.  It was according to Wiki “a racing fuel, but that usage is now prohibited under the US NHRA rules for safety reasons. It has also been used in glow fuel for model aircraft and surface vehicles.”  Yes, they use a RACING FUEL that is now prohibited for safety reasons to treat California Almonds.  I think I would take my chances with salmonellosis.  There were TWO cases of that, but now they are treating our almonds with a, yes, get this—-a “probable human carcinogen”.  

It seems as if California Almonds might not really be that healthy after all considering they are probably being treated with a chemical that has “been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as Group 2B: The agent (mixture) is possibly carcinogenic to humans.”  According to the California Almond Board:

PPO is also a surface treatment which has been approved for use on foods since 1958, . . . . PPO is very effective at reducing harmful bacteria on almonds and poses no risk to consumers. In fact, PPO residue dissipates after treatment.

Also according to the board Organic Almonds are steam pasteurized.

So I guess that “raw” almonds is the same as “No trans fat” on food labels.  And along with all the other chemicals IN our food and used to TREAT, GROW, and MANIPULATE the very DNA of our food, there is no risk posed to consumers.  Meanwhile Americans grow more obese and unhealthy and more and more drugs sold as medicine are being pushed upon the public. 

I started this post ready to extol the benefits of almonds, but now all I can say is eat at your own risk, along with all of our food supply.

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »