Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch!

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Posts Tagged ‘good fat’

Quick Easy Baked Avocado Breakfast

Posted by terrepruitt on June 25, 2013

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, ZumbaI had seen it on Facebook.  You’ve probably seen it too.  I am not sure who I saw originally post it.  But I bought avocados because I knew my husband would love it.  Then I had company for a week and didn’t make it.  Breakfast doesn’t happen for my hubby around here during the week.  I had been meaning to look up the recipe when another friend posted a picture of hers on Facebook.  She told me to bake them at 450° F for 10 to 12 minutes.  I bought small avocados thinking since he would be eating en entire avocado it would be better to eat a whole small avocado than a whole big one.  I didn’t think about it being too small for the large egg.  When I actually went to make these that is when I realized I should have bought the larger avocados.  I didn’t remember my friend saying anything about making more room for the egg so I looked up some info.  I found a lot of recipes on the web.  Just like me, when people see it, they do it then the post about it.  My friend topped hers with bacon.  Don’t tell my hubby because one of the GREAT things about this is that it is sooooo easy. Bacon would just add another component to complicate it and be messy.  Right now it is so quick and easy I can make it for him all the time!  He loved it so much I made it two days in a row!

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, ZumbaWith this first run, I bought small avocados.  Next time I am going to by bigger ones.  Not HUGE ones, but bigger.

********

Here is what I did:

1 small avocado
2 eggs
salt and pepper

Turn on oven to 450° F.  Put some aluminum foil on a baking sheet.  Put the avocado on a flat surface and find the best resting sides.  I actually smashed it a little to make it flat on two sides so that it would sit level in the pan and not spill out so much egg.  Cut the avocado in half, take out the seed, make more room for the egg by scooping out some of the avocado.  Put the avocado on the foil on the pan.  Crack an egg and put it in the avocado half.  One egg per half.  Add salt and pepper.  Bake for 12 minutes.  Check it and see if it is how you like your eggs.  I cooked the first batch for 14 minutes.  The second day I cooked them longer (2 minutes) and the yolks weren’t runny.  So I am going to settle on 14 minutes.

********Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Zumba

You can probably tell from the pictures that a lot of the egg white ended up on the foil the first time.  To me that is just as if it were a fried egg and hubby didn’t complain about eating it.  The first set of avocado eggs was served with pico de gallo.  We had some leftover so my hubby topped them with that.  You might also be able to see the plain lump of avocado on the plate.  That is the amount I scooped out from both halves.

The next set of avocado eggs, the next day, were just topped with scallions.  Also less egg white because I decided to have it for my breakfast.  Shhh . . . again, don’t tell my husband.  Some of this stuff really needs to remain between you and me. 😉

After he ate them we discussed topping them with cheese.  I am sure ONE of these days I will top them with bacon for him, but I am not doing to make that the norm.  As I said, this recipe is so easy I don’t want to complicate it with bacon.

As I have posted before avocados are soooooo good for you.  They have incredibly UNIQUE fat so I consider this a healthy breakfast.  Also considering it will not be made during the work week and more than likely not every weekend, it’s great.  The next time I make it, I might even taste it.

(October 08, 2013 . . . . I posted some things I have learned about making these at Avocado Eggs Helpful Tips)

Do you like avocados?  Is this your kinda breakfast?

Posted in "Recipes", Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments »

Why, Yes, It is GOOD Fat

Posted by terrepruitt on November 1, 2012

Don’t you just love avocados?  I know so many people who do.  Some people I know could just eat an avocado plain.  Cut it in half, pull it apart, and use a spoon to scoop out the mushy flesh inside.  Ewwww.  Not my thing.  I am not a fan of avocado at all.  I usually get as far as cutting it in half and scoop out a portion, then it starts to get on my hands and under my nails and I am done.  I end up putting it on a dish with a spoon or a knife — depending on the ripeness — and telling my husband he has to deal with it.  I lean towards the idea that they taste like dirt.  But I can’t actually remember the last time I tasted one.  But the idea of it tasting like dirt is stuck in my head.  People are often amazed that I don’t like avocado because most people LOVE them.  They say, “Oh, but you must like guacamole?”  And I don’t.  But there are many smoothie recipes that have avocado in them.  There is also a recipe that came with my blender for tortilla soup recipe that has a bit of avocado in it.  I do like that, but it has a very small bit of avocado.  I think that if you mix avocado with enough other stuff the taste can be disguised.  After looking up nutrient information on them I am going to try to add it to more recipes.  It seems the fat in avocados is unique and has the potential for many health benefits.

According to WH Foods about 85% of an avocado’s calories is from fat.  But as you probably have heard it is a “good” fat.  The properties in the fat contained in avocados have anti-inflammatory benefits.  And you might have heard that more and more research is proving that chronic inflammation in the body is being linked to many illnesses and diseases.

The information I am seeing is that avocados are thought to help lower blood cholesterol levels.   Also since they contain oleic acid it is believed they might help lowering risks of heart disease. These are some of the things that are meant by avocados contain “good” fat.

World’s Healthiest Foods nutrient information on Avocados:

1.00 cup (146.00 grams) = 233.60 calories

fiber 9.78 g   /  39.1% of the DVDance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Zumba
vitamin K 30.66 mcg / 38.3% of the DV
folate 118.26 mcg / 29.6% of the DV
vitamin C 14.60 mg / 24.3% of the DV
vitamin B5 2.03 mg /20.3% of the DV
potassium 708.10 mg / 20.2% of the DV
vitamin B6 0.38 mg  /19.0% of the DV

WebMD states:

“Avocados are a good source of fiber, potassium, and vitamins C, K, folate, and B6. Half an avocado has 160 calories, 15 grams of heart-healthy unsaturated fat, and only 2 grams saturated fat. One globe contains more than one-third daily value of vitamin C, and more than half the day’s requirements of vitamin K.”

According to Wiki, avocados originated in Mexico.  Wiki further states “The avocado is a climacteric fruit (the banana is another), which means it matures on the tree, but ripens off the tree.”  I didn’t know that.  I always thought they were picked too soon, but apparently they ripen off the tree.

So do you like avocados?  How do you eat them?  Do you have any recipes that you put them in?

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Almonds – Nutritious, But Questionable If They Are From California

Posted by terrepruitt on February 4, 2012

My last non-Nia post was about appetite suppressants, natural kinds.  The first thing I listed was almonds.  As always when I post something, even if I get the idea from somewhere else I like to look up facts for myself.  I feel better if there are a few sources confirming what I post about.  Often in my fact finding/confirming search I find other things, maybe other things entirely or other facts.

First of all the almond is a seed and not a nut.  Always makes me laugh when I learn stuff like this because all my life I thought of it as a nut . . . still do.  Almonds have a lot of fat, with 15 grams of fat per ounce, that is 23% of the Daily Value.  But it is the monounsaturated fat, the kind that we need, but still not too much.

Per ounce they have about three grams a fiber.  I think they are a nice addition to fiber you are already eating but should not be the only source as you would need to eat almost 4 ounces to get 10 grams of fiber.  That would be 60 grams of fat. 

Studies have shown almonds to help in lowering cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease.  Almonds seems to have the ability to help keep blood sugar even which can help reduce the risk of diabetes.  They contain vitamin E which is an antioxidant.  The magnesium and potassium help with blood flow and blood pressure.  Almonds are naturally gluten free.

Nutrient Values of Almonds:  Single Serving (1 ounce)
Calories—–170.0 
Protein—–6.0 g   Daily Value—–12%
Carbohydrate—–6.0 g Daily Value—–2%
Fat—–15.0 g Daily Value—–23%
  
Fats  
Cholesterol 0.000 mg Daily Value—–0%
Saturated Fat 1.5 g Daily Value—–8%
Mono Fat 10.0 g 
Poly Fat 3.0 g 
  
Carbohydrates  
Dietary Fiber 3.0 g Daily Value—–12%
  
Vitamins  
Vitamin E 10.0 IU Daily Value—–35%
Riboflavin 0.22 mg Daily Value—–4%
Niacin 0.95 mg Daily Value—–4%
Vitamin B6 0.03 mg Daily Value—–2%
Folate 17.0 mcg Daily Value—–4%
  
Minerals  
Potassium 207.0 mg Daily Value—–6%
Iron 1.0 mg Daily Value—–6%
Calcium 75.0 mg Daily Value—–8%
Magnesium 84.0 mg Daily Value—–20%
Phosphorous 147.0 mg Daily Value—–14%
Zinc 1.0 mg Daily Value—–6%
Copper 0.27 mg Daily Value—–14%
From  Nutfarm 

According to Wiki, there are no truly RAW almonds grown in and sold from California:

Because of two cases of salmonellosis traced to almonds in 2001 and 2004, the Almond Board of California proposed rules in 2006 regarding pasteurization of almonds available to the public, and the USDA approved them. The almond pasteurization program became mandatory for the California industry on September 1, 2007, and was implemented voluntarily over the previous two years.  Since September 1, 2007, raw untreated California almonds have technically not been available in the United States. Controversially, California almonds labeled as “raw” are required to be steam-pasteurized or chemically treated with propylene oxide. This does not apply to imported almonds, or to almonds sold from the grower directly to the consumer in small quantities.  Nor is the treatment required for raw almonds sold as exports to countries outside of North America.

I found the fact that California Almonds sold as “raw” are not really raw to be very interesting.  Hmmmm.  So much of what food labels say is untrue and deceitful.  I don’t know why I was surprised.

So in case you are wondering what “propylene oxide” is besides just the chemical that California Almonds are treated with.  It was according to Wiki “a racing fuel, but that usage is now prohibited under the US NHRA rules for safety reasons. It has also been used in glow fuel for model aircraft and surface vehicles.”  Yes, they use a RACING FUEL that is now prohibited for safety reasons to treat California Almonds.  I think I would take my chances with salmonellosis.  There were TWO cases of that, but now they are treating our almonds with a, yes, get this—-a “probable human carcinogen”.  

It seems as if California Almonds might not really be that healthy after all considering they are probably being treated with a chemical that has “been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as Group 2B: The agent (mixture) is possibly carcinogenic to humans.”  According to the California Almond Board:

PPO is also a surface treatment which has been approved for use on foods since 1958, . . . . PPO is very effective at reducing harmful bacteria on almonds and poses no risk to consumers. In fact, PPO residue dissipates after treatment.

Also according to the board Organic Almonds are steam pasteurized.

So I guess that “raw” almonds is the same as “No trans fat” on food labels.  And along with all the other chemicals IN our food and used to TREAT, GROW, and MANIPULATE the very DNA of our food, there is no risk posed to consumers.  Meanwhile Americans grow more obese and unhealthy and more and more drugs sold as medicine are being pushed upon the public. 

I started this post ready to extol the benefits of almonds, but now all I can say is eat at your own risk, along with all of our food supply.

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »