Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch!

    Nia: Thurs at 9 am

    Yin Yoga: Mons at 11:30 am

    Gentle Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:30 am

    Please see my website for details! I sub for the City of San Jose and the YMCA so check my website for dates and times!

    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training!

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Posts Tagged ‘X-Ray Anatomy’

Zorro Technique

Posted by terrepruitt on October 29, 2015

Back in 2010, I posted a bit about X-Ray Anatomy, principle #10 of the Nia White Belt.  It is what Nia Teachers, Yoga Teachers, Personal Trainers, and people in the profession of helping people move do to see how a body is moving.  We all do it, but Nia calls it X-Ray Anatomy.  We look at the posture of the body or the placement of the clothes to see the alignment of the bones or to see the movement of the muscle.  If we look at someone’s waist band and one side is higher than the other we can then look closer to see, if they were in a hurry when they pulled on their pants, hiking one side higher, or if their hips are actually askew.  We can look at shoulders, checking to see if one is tilted down.  We might check to see if a muscle is really tight causing an imbalance.  We look, then we go about guiding the person to adjustment, guiding them into ease.  Now . . . that is what we do for our students and/or clients.  But we wouldn’t do that to someone we just see on the street.  Even if we take a pad of paper to the park or to the mall or use our DVDs to practice with “Zorro”.

In the Nia White Belt Intensive I took, one of the tools that the co-founder of Nia, Carlos Aya-Rosas, gave us was “Zorro”.  Where you look at someone and with just a few strokes of the pen/pencil you draw their structure.  It is supposed to be quick, not a lot of details, just the things you are x-raying.  Just key bones or things (like a belt, pant legs, collars, etc.) to allow you to see posture and/or alignment.

Here are my “Zorros” from my White Belt in 2008.  We had split up into two groups and we faced each other.  Each group had a turn at making shapes and posturing and then “Zorroing”.

 

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, PiYo, Nia Technique

 

 

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, PiYo, Nia TechniqueWhen I wrote my post back in 2010, I had said in a comment I was going to go out and do some X-Ray Anatomy Zorroing, but I hadn’t.  When I came across the comment again, I decided to do it.  Here is the result of me doing Zorro on a random video of people walking and of one of the Nia Routine DVDs.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, PiYo, Nia Technique

This type of practice can help us see things quickly that might need adjustment while we are dancing.  Then we can cue some guidance to help people move in a safe way.  As an example, an easy thing to see is thigh bones, while we cannot actually SEE the thigh bone, if we look at the toe and it is pointed off in one direction we can conclude that the thigh bone is rotated . . . depending on what we are doing, that might not be the safest thing for the knee and hip.  So we can keep an eye on toes and practice X-Ray Anatomy.

I have confidence in thinking that you get the idea of this.  You can see how you can quickly look at someone and have an idea of the placement of the bones.  You can glance at someones clothes and use them to determine their alignment.  Is the clothing method 100% accurate?  No, people’s clothes might be sitting off for a number of reasons, as I mentioned in the beginning of this post, perhaps someone just pulled their pants on crocked, but this is an idea.  But using the clothes is a quick way to perhaps get an idea of what the body is doing.  Sometimes a closer inspection or more attention is needed, but for just practicing clothes are great to help with Zorroing.

Can you see how “Zorroing” can help with X-Ray Anatomy?  So might you us your X-Ray Anatomy the next time you are out?

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Outside Yoga – Easier Said Than Done

Posted by terrepruitt on May 23, 2015

I decided to go outside today to do some asana.  I needed to get some sun on my hair because yesterday I put developer on it.  I thought that I could get two things done at the same time:  sun on my hair and yoga practice.  Usually I think to do this when it is way too hot and my preparation for going outside takes longer than I actually last outside.  Today, I kept that in mind.  But I could tell there was a breeze outside, so I thought it would be ok.  Also, it was the latter part of the day so the sun wouldn’t be beating down on me directly or for that long.  So, I went outside.  I had a list of yoga poses that I was going to do.  It went pretty well, except for a few things.

The list starts out with standing poses.  I realized that our windows would serve as a mirror in case I wanted to do some X-Ray Anatomy and check my alignment.  Both proper alignment and improper alignment.  Sometimes it is helpful for me to do the pose incorrectly so I can sense it and see it, and then teach to it better.  So, the reflection was great today.

But . . . . my mat got hot.  I would move to step into a pose and the mat was too hot.  I could stay, it cooled down eventually, but it would leave my foot burning.  A distraction I decided I didn’t want after a few poses.  So I got a towel.  Ok.  Solved that little issue.

I did good on the standing poses.  I was aware of the unhappy birds.  I would see one come flying into the yard, and swoop out.  I figured they had their eyes on the feeder and were heading in then they saw me and would pull up at the last minute.  There was a bunch of tweeting, chittering, and squawking going on.  I even managed to stay in Anjaneyasana longer than I intended.  I was just about to move out of it when two little birds landed close to me.  One on the bird bath and the other on the brass ornament we have out there.  I stayed because I didn’t want to move and scare them.  This was a momentary distraction.  But I managed to stay pretty much focused.

The list of asana, then goes over some prone poses.  Again, not too bad.  I was able to ignore the bugs crawling around on the ground, while I was on my belly. . . for the most part.  They were just ants.  I was even so focused that I only allowed the multitude of strawberries to distract me for a moment.  There are A LOT of strawberries out there.  So tiny and bright red!

Then I got to the supine poses.  As I was lying there looking up at the sky I noticed the wispy clouds.  So I just stayed there a moment in Supta Baddha Konasana looking at them.  As I watched they disappeared.  I thought, “Well, that was so pretty, but I better get back to my poses.”  Then I realized I could just stay in the Reclined Bound Angle and enjoy the sky for a bit.  So I did.  Then a cloud started to form and I thought, “Ooooo, what a cool video that would make.”  So I jumped up to get my phone.  I came back to my mat and got back into the pose and waited.  Then I felt like I really wasn’t doing yoga or getting the point to it, if I were in a pose but holding my camera.  So I put it down.  I finished my list with focus.

THEN, I shot more video.

I am gonna share, you might not be able to appreciate the beauty of the day, but perhaps.  The first one might even be able to be used as a little respite from a busy day.

The other two are me just pointing the camera in the general direction of the bird.  I couldn’t actually see what I was videoing because of the sun.  But it turns out in the second one, I actually captured the hummingbird on top of the stand.  You MIGHT be able to see him.  Then he flies toward the lemon tree, I think he was not happy that he had not intimidated me enough to go away.  Then he flew off in a huff!  Or he could have been upset because I moved one of the feeders.

I enjoyed my yard and got some yoga in.  Oh, and let’s not forget, hopefully the sun helped my dingy hair color!  Hopefully you will enjoy a bit of my yard, too.

Do you ever manage to get any yoga done outside?

 

 

Posted in Misc | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Observe, Listen, Guide

Posted by terrepruitt on February 2, 2013

This is Nia Blue Belt Principle #12, Observe, Listen, Guide, Co-Creating Movement.  This is something that we can do as part of the practice of Nia.  This is something we can do in a live Nia class or even while doing a Nia DVD.  Observe the teacher, listen-observe ourselves, then guide our own bodies to match what the teacher is doing.  So watch and follow.  Then really pay attention to what it is you are doing.  Sometimes we might think we are doing the same thing but we are not.  Then guide yourself to match what the teacher is doing.  It does not have to be rushed.  The moves do not have to match right away.

All of it is done with X-Ray Anatomy which is principle #10 of the Nia White Belt.  X-Ray Anatomy does not mean we have X-ray vision, but it does mean that we see the way the body moves.  We look at the body and observe the movement of the bones.  As we dance and observe the teacher we see the placement of the bones.  We see the vertical and the horizontal.  We see the different planes.

Then, with X-Ray Anatomy, we listen to our own bodies.  We acknowledge where our bones are.  We notice the alignment.  We pay attention to the structure.  We monitor our vertical and horizontal.  We discover how our bodies do the move.  We witness it.  We can stay here until we are ready to guide ourselves to match the teacher.  If we are playing with the principle in a live class it is recommended to speak with the teacher beforehand so that they understand that we might not move onto the move they are doing until we are ready.  It is also a good idea to stand in the back of the class so as not to distract the other students.  Most people will move on to the next move, following the teacher, within one or two repetitions, but with practicing, play with, and the dancing of Nia Blue Belt Principle #12, Observe, Listen, Guide an entire sequence of moves could possibly be “missed” while in the “listening” stage.

Then when you are ready — no rush — you move onto matching the teacher.  Have your bones and your angles match hers/his.  Have your alignment match, your vertical and horizontal match.

This also works as a teacher observing the student.  We can observe the student.  We can watch the way they are doing a move.  Then we listen to our body.  We pay attention to how we are doing it.  Then without rushing we can model our student’s move.  It is a way of Co-Creating Movement.  The practice of this principle also entails Nia Blue Belt Principle #6, because there is going to be some Split, Ellipt, Blend with this.  But the order would be more of an Ellipt, Split, Blend.  We would be ellipting onto the teacher or student to observe.  Then splitting into self to listen.  Then blending in the guide portion.

This is another interesting aspect of the practice of Nia.  This is another way that Nia is unique.  We Co-Create Movement to dance with our students.  With music as our main guide we have all these principles to play with.

Can you see how the practice of Observe, Listen, Guide is a way to Co-Create Movement in a class?

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