Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch!

    Nia: Thurs at 9 am

    Yin Yoga: Mons at 11:30 am

    Gentle Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:30 am

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Posts Tagged ‘celery soup’

My Meatloaf

Posted by terrepruitt on January 23, 2017

I always cook the same thing.  If you have read my blog for a bit or looked at the recipe page you can see what I cook.  I actually USE my blog for my recipes.  I use it for

Cauliflower Cake

Easy Peasy Chicken Enchiladas With Sour Cream Sauce

My First Tomato Sauce Lasagna

A New Recipe To Love – Red Beans and Rice

Chai Tea Latte For Me

Celery Soup

Although I don’t make some of those that often.  What I do make all the time is just ground turkey and whatever leafy green (besides lettuce) that we have in the refrigerator.  If I have any ricotta in the fridge I might stir that in.  Or if I have any cream cheese.  That makes it “different.”  I would make that at least once a week, if it didn’t drive my hubby batty.  But he gets tired of it.  I don’t.  I haven’t made meatloaf in a long time.  But I just made it this past weekend.  It used to be that it wouldn’t stay together for nothing.  But then I started using less liquid in it.  Ya see, I am not a fan of tomato paste or ketchup so I  don’t always use it.  I usually make it with ground turkey.  But this last time I decided to use beef.  And while I was in the aisle about to buy some tomato paste I remembered that I had some marinara sauce in the fridge and I thought, “Hey, I can use that.”  Here is the basic recipe I use.

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Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFitMeatloaf

2 tablespoons of butter, plus enough to grease your loaf pan
1/4 of a large onion
1 lb ground meat (beef or turkey)
3 cloves of garlic
1/2 cup bread crumbs*
1 large egg
3 tablespoons ketchup**
2 tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce
3/4 teaspoon salt
a couple of turns of pepper
soy sauce
cooking cherry
1 green bell pepperDance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFit

 

Mince the onion.  Heat the butter in a pan then saute the onion.  Grease the loaf pan with butter.  Heat the oven to 350° F.  Put the meat in a large bowl.  Finely chop the garlic or use a garlic press.  Mix the garlic in with the meat.  Then add the bread crumbs and mix well.  Add the egg, ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, and salt.  Incorporate it all into the meat.  Sprinkle some pepper into the mixture.  Mix well.  Then use a measuring cup and make a combination of soy sauce and cooking cherry – totalling a 1/2 cup.  Pour it into the meat mixture and stir.  Mix it in with the meat.  Dice the bell pepper then mix it in with the meat.  Add the onions.  Mix it all together.

 

Put the mixture into your loaf pan.  Spreading it out until it fills the whole pan and is level.  Then bake it for about 50 minutes.

Slice and serve.

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Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFitIt might not stay together . . . mine rarely does.  If you like your meatloaf to stay in the loaf shape and you want to be able to slice it, use less liquid.

*in this last batch I used Panko bread crumbs and I really liked that.
**sometimes I use ketchup, sometimes I use tomato sauce.  I use whatever I have.  I have made it before without any ketchup at all.  It works.

I like it with beef, but it could be that I am just used to it with turkey because I think I like it better with turkey.

What is YOUR favorite meatloaf recipe?  One with two kinds of meat?  Maybe one with sausage? 

Posted in "Recipes", Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Parsnips

Posted by terrepruitt on May 26, 2011

When my friend posted a celery soup recipe in my comments of my celery post she mentioned she puts parsnips in soups as thickening agents because potatoes were bland so she uses the parsnips for a little additional flavor. I didn’t know what a parsnip was. I had heard of them, and I knew it was a root vegetable but I had never used one. As we were “talking” on my blog back and forth, I was thinking, “I’m going to stick to using a potato.” But as I was shopping  I decided to try making my celery soup with parsnips. So I bought two parsnips.

I realized I didn’t know if I should peel it or not. So I just decided to use my produce brush on it, which has really stiff bristles so it somewhat peels it. When I started to cut it up, I realized it was very firm, not as soft as a potato. As I was chopping it occured to me that it smelled like a carrot. While I was chopping it I realized I needed to look it up and learn about what parsnips are.

I laughed when I read what Wiki had to say because it is obvious parsnips are related to the carrot. They even slightly resemble carrots except they are lighter and larger. Although cited information states:

“The parsnip originated in the Mediterranean region and originally was the size of a baby carrot when fully grown. When the Roman Empire expanded north through Europe, the Romans brought the parsnip with them. They found that the parsnip grew bigger the farther north they went.”

In a serving (about a cup sliced) there is about:

100 calories
24 grams of carbohydrates with 6.5 grams of dietary fiber.

Parsnips are a great source of vitamin C and seven different vitamin Bs. They also contain the essential mineral manganese and also Potassium, which is crucial to heart function. This really is a nutritional power punch, because they also contain magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, and copper. WOW!

I am seeing information that says you can roast them as you would potatoes, but I wonder how good that would be. Have you tried that? I am sure you will read about it when I do. I really love roasted sweet potatoes now that I have finally found them. Parsnips might be my new love.

Posted in Food, Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Celery Soup

Posted by terrepruitt on May 24, 2011

My friend made a comment on my celery post.  She offered the recipe for celery soup (it’s in comment #5).  Awesome, you know I am on a soup kick.  There are a lot of recipes out there for celery soup, of course, but it is nice to have a recipe from a friend.  A nice tried and true recipe.  I made it tonight, but I made some adjustments.

Since I don’t like pepper, I only put a sprinkle in, but I think this might have kept it from having much flavor so I added the marjoram which — to me — tied the flavors together nicely.

1 bunch celery, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
2 parsnips, chopped
1 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp thyme
1 tsp marjoram
a sprinkle of black pepper
a sprinkle of salt
48 ozs chicken stock

Sautee onion in olive oil, then add the parsnips.  Cook the parsnips for a few minutes.  When the parsnips start to get tender, add the celery and spices, cook it for a few minutes.  Then add the stock.  Let it simmer for awhile, then let it come to a boil.  I let it cool for a bit then blend in blender or with a stick blender.

This is becoming my standard method of cooking soup.  I have just been changing the ingredients.

I will probably try the celery soup with an apple -as my friend mentions- one of these days.  What about you?  I would love to hear what you’ve come up with.

Posted in "Recipes", Food | Tagged: , , , , , , | 7 Comments »

Celery

Posted by terrepruitt on May 14, 2011

After my Los Gatos Nia Class yesterday I went to the store.  I wanted to get some food to take to the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life today.  I grabbed a bunch of celery for a snack.  I think people like celery.  I don’t.  But I didn’t realize how much I didn’t like it until I started cutting it and washing it.  I do not like celery.  As I was dealing with it I kept thinking, “What a useless vegetable.”  Well, I don’t really think that is true.  I mean it has to be good for something besides as a filler in casseroles, salads, and soups.  So . . . . to the cloud.  Ok not really because I don’t even know what that is, but I definitely decided to look it up.  Since I am going to be gone all day today at the walk, I thought I would jot down my celery education as my Saturday blog post.  Yay!

As I think back on so many things (soups, salads, and casseroles) that I didn’t like as a child I realize it is because they had celery in them.  I realize when I cook these things myself, I love them because I don’t put celery in them.  But, as I truly believed, celery is not useless.  The stalk, root, leaves, and seeds can all be used.

Celery (the stalk) is a great source of vitamin K and vitamin C.  A cup can provide you with 2.04 grams fiber.  Do people normally eat a cup of celery when they eat celery?

Celery contains nutrients that have been linked with lowering blood pressure, reducing high cholesterol, and helpful in preventing cancer.  The phthalides are the compounds that help with lowering blood pressure.  The vitamin C helps with the immune system.  I’ve posted before about how chronic inflammation is associated with many diseases, vitamin C help reduce inflammation by helping contain free radicals, so does the coumarins also found in celery.

According to Wiki celery is like peanuts in that people who are allergic to it can have a very bad reaction as people with peanuts do.  As with peanuts people who are allergic to celery can get a reaction from something that has been used to process it.  Stalks, seeds, and roots all have varying degrees of potency.

As I was cutting the celery, just the smell was bothering me.  And it is like an onion, not as strong, but once it gets your hands you can’t wash it off.  I probably washed my hands at least 10 times in the course of my preparation of snacks for the walk and it never came off.  As I was cutting it I kept thinking, “Peppery.”  Not sure why.  Since I was getting so disgusted while dealing with it, I thought, “Is it REALLY that bad?”  So I cut a small piece off to taste it.  I put it in my mouth and bit down.  Yup, it IS that bad.  I spit it out.  I just do not like celery.

I did have celery soup a couple of times and I did like that so I don’t know what that means.  Except that I WILL be trying my hand at making the soup but I will not be adding celery to anything I make.  Any fans out there?  Do you eat it raw?  Do you disguise the taste by filling it with cream cheese?  Or peanut butter?  Do you cook with it?

Thanks, as always, for letting me share.  And thanks, in advance, for sharing back.  🙂

Posted in Food, Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 18 Comments »