Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch! SIX group classes a week!

    Nia: Tues and Thurs at 9 am, Fri at 10:15 am

    Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:15 am

    Please see my website for details! I sub for the City of San Jose and the YMCA so check my website for dates and times!

    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training!

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Posts Tagged ‘exercise program’

Deep, Not On The Surface

Posted by terrepruitt on March 24, 2015

A lot of movement forms, from different dances to different types of exercise regimes, use chest isolations.  One of Nia’s 52 Moves.  See, as I have said over and over, not unique to Nia, but something that we use in our routines.  Something we can say and people know what the move is.  Even if they can’t do it, they know what it is.  This move moves the chest so – as with a lot of moves that involve the movement of the chest – some people are hesitant to do it.  Some people think of moves that move the chest as moves that moves the breasts and for some people this creates a lot of issues.  As a woman, there are some moves that are just going to move the breasts but that is not the focus.  Often times when I encourage people to focus on what is actually the focus of the movement, they can release any feelings or ideas that might be blocking the movement.  I mentioned this in my post about the Shimmy.  I have seen relief or understanding pass over people’s faces when they take the focus off of what is part of the front of the body/chest and onto the back when it comes to the shimmy.  The same with the chest isolations.  Your chest is moving that means everything connected to it, but the focus is on the muscles and the bones.

The movement of the spine, the ribs, the sternum, and even the collar bones is a chest isolations.  See, even though it might feel like you are move the front (breasts) the focus is on all the other things.  The back muscles help move the spine side to side allowing the ribs to slide from side to side over the hips.  The sternum floats to different places over the hips.  The collar bones stay level.  You can just also press your ribs forward and pull them back.  Your arms are out to the side or you can place your hands on your hips to help ensure there is no movement in the hips.  You can make your ribs move in circles.

With the side to side motion I used to reference a typewriter carriage.  Remember those?  They would slide to one side of the machine and kind of hang over then you would use the return arm to get it to slide back.  That is a GREAT visual and I actually see some people replicate it.  But then I see others in class who don’t even know what a typewriter is.  And if they do it was certainly the electric version that didn’t have a visible moving carriage with a return arm-dohicky.  So we just focus on the slide.

The chest isolations help keep you spine flexible and mobile.  It also helps you use those muscle that are inside, the intrinsic muscles.  The little ones that help with balance.  While you are doing the chest isolation movement you can focus on the and sense them.

Another way to isolate the chest is you can do a more front-back movement. If you are doing the front back portion of the move it is as if you are closing your chest and opening your back.  And then opening your chest and closing your back.  Arms can help. Bring your elbows back and draw them together to help open the chest and close the back.  Then bring them forward to open the back and close the chest.

This is one of those moves you can do anywhere.  You can do it in your car while you are stopped at a traffic light.  Don’t worry, other people don’t look up from their cell phones they will never notice you sliding your ribs around.  Enjoy the relaxed sensation and flexibility.

Are you familiar with chest isolations?  Do you do them in your current dance class?  Do you do them in your exercise program?

Posted in 52 Moves (of Nia), Nia | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

What You See Is Your Perception

Posted by terrepruitt on January 17, 2015

Perception.  Such an odd thing.  I remember when I was 15 years old and working in an office with some young women.  They were probably in their 20s so really still young.  I remember all the stories they would tell me and how they would carry on like 20-somethings do.  Then one day a child walked in and the woman I knew to be a young person who enjoyed to go out and have a good time became a mom.  It was the weirdest thing.  I am not saying this woman was a party animal, but it was just odd to see this woman go from working woman to working mom.  Since she didn’t really talk about her kid all that much it was easy to forget that she was a mom.  I am not saying she didn’t talk about her kid because she didn’t love her child or because she didn’t care.  She talked to me more about things that a 15 year old is involved in or going through; relationships, school, and being young . . . . not kids.  The group conversations in the office tended to be around other things since not everyone had kids.  Also, there was seeing a tough boss lady with her spouse.  Seeing the loving side of a meany.  Seeing different sides.  I didn’t know the woman as a mother, so it was odd to see her acting like one.  I didn’t know the gruff boss lady as a wife so it was odd to see her act like one.   Friends also might have different perceptions than family members because they’ve seen different things and experienced different things.  Also new friends and old friends.  Sometimes people modify their behaviors, mature, or just change so people who are just meeting someone for the first time might not have any idea of how it used to be.  So the perception of the person is different for the new person than for the person that has been around.  What you know to be true from your experience, can be different from what someone else knows because they have had different experiences.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose,  Nia at the San Jose Community Centers, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex City of San Jose, San Jose Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, PiYoSo amazing how that is. It is amazing how everyone’s perception can be different.  Our perception has a lot to do with ourselves.  Someone who has been cheated on by a significant other might take “I’m working late,”  completely different from someone who has never had that mistrust thrust upon them.

This is all just talking about people.  What about “things”?  Like viewing clouds or art.  Two people look up in the sky, one person sees a dinosaur and the other a horse.  And even if both people were to look up and see a horse it would probably still be different types of horses.  As I was contemplating the “people” aspect it occurred to me that recently I had been thinking about perception in regards to Nia.  I always say it is a practice like yoga, and for those people who think of yoga as a religion, I am wondering now if they think I mean that Nia is a religion.  A recent conversation made me think so.  Even though I was hoping I was explaining it well when I say that you can take some of the ideals and principles of Nia out into the world just like you do with yoga.  I guess that could sound like a religion – especially if you think of yoga as a religion.  Yoga being a religion is also a funny thing, because some people say it is and some people say it isn’t.  I was hoping to get a regular Nia class going at a yoga studio a long time ago and I said something about “some people believe it is a religion” to the owner of the studio, she got very upset saying that was not true.  Well, it is VERY true some people DO think it is a religion.  I never got a class there.

I think of Nia as an exercise program with a holistic twist.  Just like yoga.  But yoga can be taken to the point of being a religion, but not everyone that does yoga considers it a religion.  I actually don’t know anyone that teaches Nia who considers it a religion.  But the more I think about it, the more I can see how some people could think of it that way.  Perhaps comparable somehow to the people who have been cheated on.  If they think of everything as being in competition with their own religion maybe anything outside of it that you practice would be considered a religion to them.  I don’t know . . . that is one of the things I have been thinking about when thinking about how people see things.  Perception is weird.  The ol’ “glass half full, glass half empty” thing.

Do you ever experience the differences in perception?  With people you know that your friends know?  With co-workers?  With family?  How do you experience it?

Posted in Misc | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Nia “Standing”

Posted by terrepruitt on February 6, 2014

My last post was about the Garland Pose or Malasana.  That is a yoga pose.  The Garland Pose post was long enough so I didn’t talk about the advanced positions of that pose.  In Nia the pose could be compared to “Standing” which is the fourth stage in Nia’s 5 Stages.  In Nia it is also a little different. Nia’s 5 Stages is a movement practice through the five stages of human development.  While I have mentioned Nia’s 5 Stages before in my blog I have not written about them in depth and this post will not be in depth either.  I am just touching upon the fourth stage, including it in my little series about squatting.  Squatting is important and Nia knows that.  Nia recognizes it as a stage of human development.  Although Nia does not believe it should be abandoned and that is why we have the 5 Stages as a movement practice and why we include squatting in many of our routines.  As I said standing is the fourth stage and it is somewhat like a squat.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Zumba, PiYo, Gentle YogaThe Nia 5 Stages are the stages we go through in development.  Stage one is Embryonic.  Stage two is Creeping.  Stage three is Crawling.  Stage four is Standing.  Stage five is Walking. First we are in the womb, then most of us creep, then we crawl, we stand (squat), then walk.  Stages of human development.  Stage four, “Standing”, is a low or full squat.

I have posted about squats before.  In fact when I did I mentioned that we don’t do them in Nia.  And we don’t — or I hadn’t done the type of squats I was writing about.  I was writing about squats done in a way that is more in line with weight training.  Using weights and other equipment.  I believe there are weight lifting competitions where people do really low squats with weights, but . . . I am not going to go there.  There are a lot of things that elite athletes do that I would STRONGLY recommend the average person NOT do . . . . EVER.

I DO recommend full squats (without weights) . . . providing your body is able to do them I believe you should.  And by able I mean there is no medical reason you can’t, you have joints and body parts that will allow you to do them.  Doing squats will help you in so many ways.

With Nia’s fourth stage – standing – we are coming from a crawling position.  The way we move from crawling to “standing” is we open our feet wider than our knees while our knees are still on the ground.  Then curl our toes then push back onto our feet.  Since the 5 stages of human development are based on the way the body was designed to move and how we develop ideally, the idea is to push back onto feet that are flat on the ground.  However, Nia is a practice done in YOUR OWN BODY’S WAY so it is possible that both feet cannot be flat on the ground.  So we take the stages in stages.  What works for many is to have ONE foot flat on the ground while the other one has a heel up.  Then we just alternate.  This allows for each foot to engage in ankle flexibility.

The next stage in this stage is to raise the torso up, have the chest facing forward and not down . . . if you are doing the alternating of the feet.  If both feet are flat on the earth the chest is probably already facing mostly forward because the buttocks are lowered and the legs are folded over so the chest is somewhat up against the thighs.  In both positions lift the chest up further, sternum to the sky.  When ready the arms also come up, reaching to the sky.

We stay in this stage as long as the present workout dictates.  Could be just a second or two . . . could be a bar (of a song) . . . whatever is appropriate for the moment.  Then we rise up – nose leading the way – onto our toes and into the fifth stage which is walking.

Squatting is important because of the benefits it provides.  Being able to come up from a squat provides even more benefits.  Like push-ups and/or planks, squats could easily be one of the “must haves” in ANY workout or exercise program.  Nia understands the benefits.  So when I said we didn’t do squats in Nia, I wasn’t talking about this type of squat or what Nia’s 5 stages calls standing.

What benefits can your body receive from Nia’s standing/squatting? 

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The Zumba Fitness Program Really Is a Program

Posted by terrepruitt on September 13, 2012

Zumba is astronomically popular.  The marketing and “it’s a party” advertising has attracted MILLIONS of people.  My first few Zumba classes were fun but I left feeling as if Zumba was not a very safe product.  Not all the classes contained a warm up and a cool down.  Most had no instruction, just the teacher pointing and making other hand signals I was not familiar with.  After having taken the required Zumba Instructor Training, I see that the Zumba Fitness Program is constructed to be safe and meets with the general fitness guidelines.  It could have been that the classes I had taken were not following the program with the prescribed class format.
 
Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, ZumbaA standard guideline for fitness classes that is considered safe for the general pubic is 10 to 15 minutes warm-up and at least a 5 minute cool down. Since Zumba is marketed as being something everyone can do, the program incorporates these guidelines. Zumba instructors are trained to follow this set formula for the safety of all participants.  It is understood that many people who attend a workout class come in “cool”, it could even be that their muscles and bodies have been in one position for most of the day.  Muscles need to warm up and get blood flowing in order for there to be less risk of injury.  A warm up is necessary for the body, it is also nice for the brain so that one can “shake off” the happenings of the day and embrace the workout that is ahead.

In addition to the Zumba Fitness Program following the standard fitness guidelines in regards to a warm up, a “formula” for the warm-up section of the class was created.  The formula has three components, and if they are used correctly they should allow for a nice smooth transition into the remainder of the class.  The warm up is built into the Zumba Fitness class model to prepare you for the bulk of the class.  The bulk of the class, as you may know, has a very unique formula.

Zumba was not created to be an elite fitness class, it was meant for everyone to enjoy themselves.  There are moves and steps to follow, but each participant is allowed to add their own style and their own “flavor” — as it is called in the Zumba world.  That means not everyone will be doing it the exact same way.  Not everyone can shake their hips as the instructors do on the training DVDS and I don’t think anyone is as loose a Beto. 

While I was taking the Zumba Instructor training I kept wondering if the creator of Zumba, Alberto “Beto” Perez and the co-creator of Nia, Carlos AyaRosas know each other, even though one is from Columbia and the other one is from Mexico.  Some of the same ideas and philosophies are in both exercise/fitness programs.  To me they have a lot of ideas in common.  I had no idea how similar the programs were until I attended the Zumba Instructor training.

I have posted a bit in the past about Zumba because people are familiar with what Zumba is but not with what Nia is so they often ask me for comparisons so they can understand.  Well, in the past my answers were coming from the perspective of a Nia Teacher who had taken a few Zumba classes.  Now my answers and my comparisons will be from an instructor of both Nia and Zumba.  So I will be posting more about Zumba in the future.  I will be sharing and clarifying a bit about the actual Zumba Fitness Program.  I will also be doing my best at delivering the Zumba Fitness Program making my Zumba Fitness classes fun and accessible for everyone.

I’ll see you in class!

Posted in Zumba | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Different Rollers, Different Things

Posted by terrepruitt on August 9, 2012

It has been over three years since I posted about foam rollers.  I know I post a lot about Nia because I teach it, but I am surprised I have not followed up with some additional posts about foam rollers.  I think they might have become more common since my last post.  I have seen them in gyms now, whereas I had not seen them there before.  They have moved into mainstream exercise and are not just for the more therapeutic type of movements forms.  It is nice to see them being used more frequently because they are a great piece of exercise equipment.  They are affordable and portable.  A great combination for exercise equipment.  Typically they are 4 inches or 6 inches in diameter and they are 12 to 32 inches long.  They are used in their whole form – round – or cut in half length wise.  The different lengths are used for different things . . . obviously.  So goes for the whole round or the half round.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia at the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, NiaSince the foam roller is a great tool to use for people ranging from “new-to-exercise” to serious athletes it is nice to have a variety of them.  The halved rollers can be used in the beginning of an exercise program to allow the body to be accustomed to standing on a rounded surface.  The flat sides would be placed on the ground while you stand on the rounded sides.  This could be used as a first step in a conditioning progression.   Flipping the rollers over and using them on carpet could be used as the next step.  The halved rollers flat side up on carpet.  The carpet would help keep the rounded side of the rollers from being really slippery. Then the progression could be the halved rollers on a hard smooth surface.  The smooth surface of the floor would provide the additional challenge.  Next graduating to the long halved roller.  You could start on carpet then once mastered move the roller to a smooth surface.   Eventually moving on to the whole roller.

That is just an example of how the foam rollers can be used for more than just stretching.  Standing on foam rollers in the aforementioned progression would be a way to improve core strength and balance.  And that was just a quick and easy example.  There are many things that can be added to the information above to either make it easier or more difficult and/or to lengthen the progression.

So foam rollers are not just for stretching and improving flexibility and mobility they can be used for improving strength, coordination, and balance.  They are a great thing to add to an exercise program.  There are a lot of different exercise you can do with them.  I am not going to wait another three years to share some of them with you.  I am going to be posting some in my next few posts.  So stay tuned.

Have you seen foam rollers in your gym?  Have you seen people do exercises with them?  Do you exercise with a foam roller?

Posted in Exercise and Working Out | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Do Me A Favor, No, Do YOU A Favor

Posted by terrepruitt on July 14, 2012

I have a huge favor or request.  I know I have mentioned it before, but I don’t think I have done a single post on it, but recently I, myself, was confronted with this situation so I really want to make a serious plea.  I am going to go out on a limb and say this is a plea for many fitness instructors/dance exercise teachers.  If you go to a class and you don’t like it, please, please, please try it at least two more times.  If you are ok with the instructor, but the class is just not that good in your opinion, give it another chance.  There are a million reasons why you might not like that particular class on that particular day.  It could be the routine or exercises you were doing that day so ask the instructor when s/he will be changing to a new one.  Or it could be the music, so, again talk to the instructor.  Maybe ask if the class you just experienced was the norm or the typical class.  Sometimes instructors decide to change it up and try something new but after taking it to the class they might decide they didn’t like it either.  So ask.  Also ask the other students.  Don’t give up on something after just one class.

If taking three classes from the same instructor sounds like a waste of time and money to you, try a different instructor.  We are all different and we strive to represent the brand/technique/practice to the best of our ability, but we also add out own style and it could be that the style is not something that you connect with.  It could also be — if you don’t like the class — that the instructor is not necessarily sticking to the program.  You might enjoy the class with an instructor that is more closely following the idea of the fitness brand/technique/practice.

I had been to a few fitness classes recently and I felt some elements that I believe should be included in this type of class were missing. Plus in a couple of classes I felt as if it was not all that the brand promised.  But I attended a few more classes with different instructors and I began to see a big difference.  I also took it upon myself to become educated a bit in the type of class and now I understand why I like one class over the other.  One instructor was following the program more closely than the other one and it actually is more enjoyable.  I actually went to four or five classes with three different instructors.  I walked out of one class saying, “Dang, I really hate that.”  Whereas the other two I thought, “Now that is what it is all about!”

So if you walk out of a class thinking you really don’t like it, that is ok, you obviously didn’t like THAT particular class, but it could be the brand/technique/practice wasn’t represented correctly.  So try again.  Maybe the instructor was having a bad day.  Yes, it is our job to instruct and hold a good class, no matter what, but . . . c’mon we are only human.  Sometimes we just have “off days”.  There are all types of reasons to give an instructor another chance.

I know I have mentioned this before, but if I HAVE done an entire post on it before and I am repeating myself I apologize, but I really feel strongly about this.  Because, as I said, twice I walked out of a class saying, “No way!”, but then the two other instructors showed me a “Yes way!”

Now keep in mind that I am not just talking about Nia, I am talking about ANY class you try; Zumba, Jazzercise, Barre Fitness, Turbo Kick, whatever.

If you end up giving it a good try and still end up not liking it at least you will have burned some calories in the process.  But I bet if you were drawn to the class in the first place you will end up finding a class and an instructor that you like.  Just don’t give up after the first class, do yourself a favor and keep at it and you’ll end up finding something to allow you to gain all the benefit of an exercise workout.

Have you ever gone to a class and not gone back because you didn’t like it after only one class?

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Stability Ball Pass

Posted by terrepruitt on June 25, 2011

This is number 10 in the Ten Minute Workout or number one if you are doing the set from number 10 to number 1.  The Stability Ball Pass is basically a sit up, but you are adding your legs into the mix.  So it is a V sit up.  You move your body to form a V.

Lie down on your back holding the ball between your lower legs more toward your ankles and feet, raise your legs with the ball still between them, at the same time bring your head, shoulders, upper chest and arms up to meet your legs with the ball.  Grab the ball and lower your upper body back down to the ground as your legs go down too.  While you are lowering your upper body down you are still holding the ball in your hands, your arms go over your head so the ball lands on the floor.  In this ten minute workout that is designed to be “one”.  Then lifting upper body while holding the ball to meet you legs, giving the ball to your legs and laying down again is two.  When you get comfortable and feel ready you can always call this whole thing “one” and do ten that way.

The ball and bringing you legs up might distract you from your upper body, but don’t let it.  Think of doing a regular sit up so your upper body is doing the correct movement, then add the legs with the goal of grabbing the ball.

As with all exercises squeezing all your muscles will help them work to their full potential.  If you want when you exchange the ball from legs to hands or hands to legs hold it for a moment with an extra squeeze.

So . . . does this make sense?  You got it?

Ok . . . .now you have details of all ten exercisesWhat questions do you have?  Do you want some explanation on how to do any of these with alternate equipment?  Or with no equipment?  Have you been doing the exercises?  Have you had any revelations or challenges?  Let me know.

Thank you.

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Hamstring Curls

Posted by terrepruitt on June 14, 2011

In putting together the exercises for a Ten Minute Workout, I wanted to get a quick “full body” workout.  I understand that this ten minutes might not target the ENTIRE body, but it gets most of it.  Plus I was trying to use the exercise equipment that I have.  I was bothered by the fact that I had these toys and I didn’t use them.  So I was thinking of exercises that utilized them.  Although, all of these exercises can be modified to be done without the equipment.  This Hamstring curl uses the stability ball.

Lie on your back with your calves/ankles on the stability ball.  Push your hips up into a bridge.  Pull the ball, rolling it towards your butt so your feet end up on it and your knees are up.  Then roll it out.  Your arms can be wherever they are most comfortable.  Arms can be used to help stabilize your body.  It could be at first that your body has a tendency to roll to one side or you feel as if you are going to tip over.  🙂  That is part of the exercise.  You are using your hamstrings to pull the ball back, but you might be engaging your arms a lot to stabilize your body as you learn this exercise.  Eventually your legs will be able to control the ball AND your balance without really USING your arms.

Each time the ball rolls towards your butt count that as one.

How is that for you?  What questions come up?

Posted in Hamstrings, Ten Minute Workout (Posts) | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Terre’s Ten Ten in Ten

Posted by terrepruitt on June 2, 2011

Here is the Ten Minute Workout with some explanation.  Questions and comments welcome.

1 – Long lunges: lunge with a long step with a dumbbell in each hand down at your side then come back up to standing.  Each “step” is one.

2 – Biceps Curls: hold a dumbbell in each hand, keep upper arms still bring dumbbell to bicep and then down.

3 – Squats:  lower down as if you are going to sit in a chair then stand up while standing on the flat side of the BOSU.

4 – Triceps kickbacks: each hand holding one end of the resistance band, arms are pulled back with elbows back (past your ribs), pull the band back straightening the arm (only forearms move) while standing on the band on the flat side of the BOSU in a slightly bent over position. Keep a straight back.

5 – Hamstring curls:  lie down legs on the stability ball (the ball is about half way up the calf) and pull the ball back rolling it towards your butt and then roll it back out while in bridge position.

6 – Sit ups: knees up feet on floor lift shoulders off the floor, then lift more, somewhat more of a crunch.

7 – Triceps Extensions:  weights in hands behind your head (hands are close together or even holding both weights), elbows pointed to the sky, lift weights to the sky only moving at the elbow straightening your arms.

8 – Push ups: using the BOSU (round side on ground).

9 – Bent over lateral raises with band: each hand holding one end of the band, open arms out to side while standing on the band on the flat side of the BOSU in a slightly bent over position. Keep a straight back.

10 – Stability ball pass: lie down hold ball between your feet/ankles raise your legs holding the ball while rising up with shoulders and arms to meet your legs (as in a V sit-up) grab the ball bringing it over your head to the floor.  Lift up back up lifting legs and give the ball back to our legs. (Count “one” at each ball touch down)

As with ANY exercise or exercise program, be careful and be sure you are able to safely do the exercise you engage in.  If you need doctor’s clearance, be sure to get it.

Do ten repetitions of these ten exercises in ten minutes. Repeat if time allows.

What questions do you have?  Let me know.

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Ten Minute Workout

Posted by terrepruitt on May 31, 2011

There are a lot of 10 minute workouts.  Ten minutes is really not a long time, it probably won’t get you to any lofty fitness goals, but that is where specificity comes in.  If your goal is to run a marathon or bench press 200 pounds then 10 minutes of working out won’t get you there.  You need to train specifically for specific goals.  Ten minute workouts are good for other things.  If you are really pressed for time and just need a quick fix.  If you are new to exercising.  If you are doing another form of working out and just want to add a little something more.  If you are recovering from an injury.  If you are just learning a new exercise.  If you have ADD.  🙂  There are a lot of good reasons and ways to incorporate a ten minute workout into your day.

There are also different ways you can do a workout for ten minutes.  Again, how you do it depends on why you are doing it.  If you are pressed for time sometimes just getting through it is what you need to do.  That ten minutes will just help you feel like you did something good for yourself even if the rest of the day is jammed packed with a lot of other stuff.  If you are just starting an exercise program it could be that getting through ten minutes is all you can do . . . it depends on the workout.  If you have a great program that you do, say cardio, like Nia, but you want to add in a little training with weights or additional stretching a 10 minute workout could be perfect.  And if you are recovering from an injury it could be that 10 minutes is all that you can do safely.  When learning a new exercise it could be that 10 minutes is all that your brain can take at a time.  Again, it all depends on why you are doing it AND what you are doing.

Before I hurt my foot, I had come up with a little 10 minute workout I felt was a good way to get a quick workout all over.   I designed it to be done with the workout tools and toys I have.  I only did it a few times before I hurt my foot.  Since I really was having to concentrate on teaching my classes, I pretty much stopped doing everything else.  So now I am feeling that a ten minute workout would be great for me because of a few of the reasons I stated above.

The list/workout is what you see pictured here.  It is nothing revolutionary it is just 10 exercises that you do 10 times each in 10 minutes.  In my next regularly scheduled post (Thursday) I will explain the list.   In subsequent regularly scheduled posts (Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays) I will give more detailed explanations of the exercises, modifications, and various things that come up related to this 10 minute workout.  And everyday, I will post when I have done it.  I will actually be doing some of the exercises in a modified fashion because of my foot.  I have to modify my activity based on my teaching schedule and daily activity.

Anytime you want you to can do this list.  Post in the comment that you did it too.  Ask questions and I will either answer them in the comments or in a separate post.  I think this is a great way for me to share some exercises with you. I hope you will join me in this 10 minute workout.  Really 10 minutes isn’t that long.  Ten exercises done 10 times each in 10 minutes.  Ten Ten in Ten.  You can do it.  And you can let me know when you’ve done it.  Ok?  What do you say?  Are you in?

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