Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch! SIX group classes a week!

    Nia: Tues and Thurs at 9 am, Fri at 10:15 am

    Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:15 am

    Please see my website for details! I sub for the City of San Jose and the YMCA so check my website for dates and times!

    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training!

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Posts Tagged ‘DOMS’

Five Ways To Help Relieve Pain

Posted by terrepruitt on July 23, 2018

Not only am I receiving my dad’s magazines, but my neighbor had some subscriptions that he is no longer using so he is passing them on to us. I have a lot of magazines. Most magazines are just advertisements. Even the “articles” are just ads disguised as “information”. I used to go through a magazine and just rip out the advertisements the second I got it, but now I am passing magazines onto one of the community centers where I work so I don’t rip out the advertisements. I have been perusing the magazines to get information to pass onto my readers. An article I read recently in Good Housekeeping was titled 5 {WHO-KNEW WAYS} to Fight Pain. Well, many of us knew, but sometimes it is interesting to see what others are saying. And some of them were NEW to me.

The five things are Diet, Sleep, Reframing, Relaxing, and Exercise.

The first thing they recommend to help ease pain is change the diet. One of the main causes of pain is chronic inflammation.  I am not sure if you have ever noticed that some days you might wake up a little sore. Could be that you didn’t even do anything the day before to make you sore. But when you get out of bed you notice that your joints feel a little stiff. A lot of people attribute this to the aging process. While aging probably has something to do with it, I know plenty of young people that wake up (or sit for a long time) and have a difficult time moving right after. For me, I believe it has a lot to do with what I have eaten. Next time you wake up sore without having lifted weights or done anything to warrant it, think about what you had to eat the day before or even the day before that. Just keep an idea in your mind of what you had. Then see if you are sore the next time you have that same food. I believe that for some people gluten causes joint pain. There are a lot of foods that can trigger an immune response and they (the foods) are different for everyone. So switching up your diet might help alleviate some pain. There are Anti-Inflammation Foods you might want to add to your diet.

Lack of sleep can increase inflammation in the body. And we have already stated that inflammation is one of the main causes of pain. Also, the article is saying that sleep deprivation can change how people experience pain. Studies have shown that getting an hour’s more sleep before surgery has helped patients need less pain medication.

Then there is “reframe the pain“, as in stop talking about it, stop dwelling on it, stop focusing on it, and start thinking about it differently. Instead of just thinking about the pain and expecting it to be bad, think about something else. Focus on something positive, kind of distract yourself from the pain. Or instead of saying something like, “Oh this is going to be awful, it is going to hurt so bad.” Perhaps think, “This is something that I can handle. It will not be that bad. I can easily get through this.” I found an online article about “Reframing”.

Then there is relaxing. The article mentions Biofeedback with electrodes or classes that you can take the help you be more mindfully relaxed. I believe that breathing techniques like Pranayama might help. Focusing on relaxing tense muscles can help bring ease into the body.

There is also mention of exercise. When you exercise your body produces endorphins which give you that happy feeling and that can help fight the pain. Exercising for pain management really depends on the type of pain, of course. You have to be able to move and make certain you are not further injuring yourself. People often ask me after an intense workout that has left them sore, what is the best way to get better, and my belief is to keep moving. Some people don’t think that way so we all need to deal with DOMS in a way that you feel is best. While you want to let the muscle recuperate sitting around and doing nothing isn’t necessarily going to make the aches and pains go away.

What type of pain can these five things help?

Diet: Chronic pain due to inflammation

Sleep: Any kind of pain

Reframing: All types of pain

Relaxing: Chronic pain

Exercise: Mild to moderate Chronic pain, especially muscles pain (DOMS)

So for many of us who would rather not reach for a pain killer in the form of a pill, these ideas might be something to try. What do you think?

Posted in Misc | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Ball Massager

Posted by terrepruitt on July 7, 2011

While I was doing a Nia DVD today, I kept sensing some discomfort in my back.  I have a spot, a muscle I guess, that sometimes becomes “whiny”.  I think that particular spot on my back, directly next to my backbone to the right, right at the edge of my shoulder-blade, holds all of my stress and tension.  When it came to the floorplay exercise portion of the Nia workout I was focused on my back.  It was really getting my attention.  I have had a student assisting me with my toe/foot and she often says she is “releasing it”.  I wondered if I could touch my back and “release” it.  So I did.  I pressed on the spot that was speaking to me so loudly.  It seemed to help.  I believe in the power of touch.  But since it is a place on my back that is needing touch it is not easy for me to get the entire area.  While I was laying on the floor I was wishing I had a tennis ball to roll on.

Have you ever heard that?  Using a tennis ball to massage your back.  I had a friend who mentioned to me that she was told to put a couple of tennis balls in a sock and roll on them.  You can roll on them against a wall or on the floor, whichever is most comfortable for you.  I had heard to use the balls, but I hadn’t heard of the sock until she mentioned it.  The tennis balls could be used to massage more than just your back, you could roll it under your legs or on your arms.

I don’t have tennis ball, but I do have a rather large “super ball”.  I don’t know if that is what it is called, but that is what I remember we used to call them when I was young.  You know those balls that bounce really well?  It is a “The Incredibles” ball.  It is kind of old so it is yellowed.  It is also really hard.  Much more hard than a tennis ball and a little smaller.  I remembered that the last time I saw it I had used it for my foot and it was in the entertainment center.  How convenient?  It was right there.  YAY!

At first I tried using it while laying on the floor.  That didn’t work so well because it was difficult to roll on the floor without using my elbows which, in doing so, caused me to rise away from the ball.  Plus the ball is really hard.  So I used it with the wall.  I leaned on the ball while it was on the wall.  WOW!  Awesome.  I think the muscle that gets annoyed is small and there was almost a clicking sound as the ball rolled over it.  That is how tight and grumpy it was.  As I mentioned, I had used the ball on my feet before, it is a great foot massagerm just rolling it under my foot, but I hadn’t used it on my back.  Glad I thought of that.

So what do you think?  Have you heard of using tennis balls to massage sore muscles?  Have you ever tried it?  Do you use the sock method?  Oh do tell, I would love to hear about it.  It could definitely help with DOMS.  What do you say?

Posted in Helpful Hints | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Sore Hamstrings

Posted by terrepruitt on June 12, 2011

My Ten Minute Workout is done.  I do believe that ten minutes is not that long and it can be done, but one does have to manage their time properly and I did not do that yesterday.  I had plenty of time in which to do it, but I kept getting delayed.  Also, I was sensing my hamstrings wanting a rest.  I didn’t really think they NEEDED a rest, they are not injured or really sore, but I am aware of them when I get up.  The Nia routine I did most of last week has a lot of bows in it.  The name of the Nia routine is Passion and when the music is in fully swing it allows the passion of dance to be experienced and I have been taking my bows low.  I am experiencing some soreness in my hamstrings.

But the main reason for me not doing my Ten Ten in Ten is my poor time management.  Unless I am in a lot of pain and think that further movement will damage my muscle for me the best course of action is to work through it, even if I tone the volume of movement down.  This workout MIGHT cause DOMS to be experienced and that is when you have to decide what it best for you.

How are you doing today?

Posted in Ten Minute Workout check-in | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Ball of the Foot

Posted by terrepruitt on June 29, 2010

We often step on the ball of our foot.  We often call it the toe.  The Ball of the foot is one of the 52 Moves of Nia.  Ballerinas are actually on their toes and they do it in special shoes that have a support in them where their toes are.  We usually are stepping onto the BALL of our foot when we step on the “toe”.  It is the ball portion of the foot that supports the weight when we are “on our toes”.

This is plantar flexion and assists with keeping the ankle joint flexible.  If you are standing on the foot you are flexing it can also assist with strength.

In a Nia workout class we do all types of movement and sometimes we are using the ball of our foot.  We could be stepping or standing.  The moment might call for us stepping ONTO the ball either forward, back, or even laterally.  Or it could be that we are standing and just rising up. This could be a position where we stay either in a display of balance or it could be a display of agility, a temporary place where we quickly move onto another move.  Either way it is all part of how the body was designed to be moved.

It might be a nice idea to keep in mind that moving and working the foot in different ways than it is used to being worked might cause some muscle soreness or tenderness through the entire leg.  If you are never on your the ball of your feet and suddenly your dancing a few moments on them, your calves might remind you of it later that day or even the next day.  Same goes for the whole foot, if you are not in the habit of moving on the whole foot your ENTIRE leg could end up letting you know you worked some leg muscles.

As with the whole foot, the ball of the foot can be used in the stances of Nia.

Just as I have done with the heel lead and the whole foot, I am going to suggest that you take note of this foot position.  As you walk notice when your stride gets to the point of the ball of your foot.  As you reach for something on the top shelf and you balance on your toes, notice the flex of your foot and the muscles in your calves.  As you walk through your day notice the ball of your foot.

Posted in 52 Moves (of Nia), Nia | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Nia Feels Like a Vacation

Posted by terrepruitt on May 29, 2010

I am always a little taken off guard when someone comes to me before Nia class and tells me with shock that they were sore (after the last Nia class).  I recently came to the realization that these people who are shocked–and maybe a bit offended–are shocked because they didn’t realize they are exercising in Nia.  They didn’t realize what a great workout they received.  They certainly weren’t aware that they were using muscles they may not have used in a long time OR that they may not have used in that way.  Nia is a vacation from normal exercise, but it IS exercise.

Nia is a cardio dance exercise class so there is ample opportunity to move with an intensity that will get your heart rate up.  Some people sweat, some people don’t.  Everyone does Nia differently.  EveryBODY has different needs.  Needs can change from class to class.  Nia teaches to listen to your body and to learn to give it what it needs.

Nia is a form of movement.  It is a mixture of nine different movement forms.  The mixture includes actual movements from some of these forms and elements and ideas from these forms.  But it is not these forms.  In other words if you attend a Nia class you will not be practicing yoga, tai chi, or the other martial arts but we might do some moves from some of those forms or we might use the ideas from them.

With the availability of so many moves and concepts we are able to move in Nia the way the body was designed to move.  We can play in the different planes, moving up and down and work on the ground.  Nia allows us to work on flexibility, agility, mobility, strength, and stability.

All of this motion and action is sometimes different from what your body might be used to doing.  Even though the movements are moves the body was actually designed to do, some of them you might not do in your everyday life, for instance rotating and opening the joints.  When you move your body after not moving it at all or move it in a different way than it is accustomed to moving there is a possibility that you will experience soreness or DOMS.

It could be that the muscles are sore or it could be that there is awareness of the joints because the tissues or muscles that make up the joints are strengthening.  While doing Nia we encourage people to try all the moves and experience them, but to tweak them so that they are comfortable to the body.  Since we invite participants to sense Joy during the workout they might walk away not realizing that there could be some soreness after.  Nia is also non-impact, but it can be intense so sometimes people are amazed that they sweat.  It IS a workout after all.

Not everyone likes to sense the soreness that might accompany a good workout.  I like it, I appreciate it because I know that it means I did something good for my body.  It is ok for a body to be a little sore, it means that it is adapting to change.  If the body is sore because it has not moved then it is good to have it adapt to the change of movement.  If you are one that does not like to feel the effects of change on your body, then while in a Nia class you can make your movements smaller.  If you don’t mind a little change then keep playing in all the levels.  Nia allows for which ever path you chose and whatever you chose is up to you, I just wanted to help you understand so you can be aware of what might be happening and make an informed and mindful choice.  It is my pleasure to be your travel guide and enable Nia to feel like a vacation.

I also have Tips for a Pleasurable Nia Experience and Tips for Moving Nia.

Are you ready for a relaxing yet exciting journey?

Posted in Nia | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments »

DOMS

Posted by terrepruitt on May 27, 2010

You have probably felt it but didn’t realize what it was called.  DOMS or Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness is the feeling we have after we have exercised, if we have worked the muscle hard or it is not used to moving.  It is usually experienced 24 to 72 hours after the workout.  It can be severe discomfort on the verge of pain or just slight discomfort.  Everyone has different pain tolerances.  It is important to identify it as just DOMS and not something more serious.  DOMS will disappear whereas if there is an injury it might have to be treated.

DOMS is no longer associated with build up of lactic acid in the muscles.  It is now known to be the result of intense eccentric contraction.  Often people associate muscle soreness with body building or lifting weights.  This association is correct because in order to make a muscle bigger it must be stressed to the point of rebuilding, and most workouts that stress the muscles include eccentric exercise.  But also muscles that are not used can get sore when they are used. 

As we move through our lives we form movement patterns.  Our muscles become used to these patterns.  If we were to add weight to our movement patterns it is likely that our muscles could become sore and experience DOMS because we are stressing the tissue.  But without the added resistance there is almost no chance of soreness.  Think of the last time you helped someone relocate (as in move from one home to another).  We ALWAYS you hear people complain how sore they are.  The movements they did are normally the same; walking, lifting, bending, etc.  But usually when you are helping someone move you are helping them move heavy furniture so there is resistance to the walking, lifting, bending.  Even if you aren’t helping with the really heavy items it could be your chore to move the boxes . . . . a lot of boxes so the repetitiveness of that has the potential to cause soreness.

If you move in a way that your body is not accustomed to and/or you use muscles that are not used to be moved, sometimes there is no need to add resistance and there can be soreness.  So it is possible for a muscle that is used to experience DOMS if used in a different way or to get sore using muscles we never use.

I have shared with you in the beginning of my blog what I use for muscle soreness.  Unless it is seriously painful for me to move, I like to actually work and move through my soreness.  I feel that my body adapts quicker if I keep moving.  But I am also not an intense body builder and I also move often.  When I say keep moving I don’t mean to keep doing the exercise that caused me to be sore, but I do mean to move, and stretch and work it out.  Working through it works for ME, for MY body.  You have to decide and learn what works for you.  Also, each time might be different.  If you do a really intense workout and you end up sore you might want to rest a bit whereas if you do a less intense workout you might be able to recognize that moving through it would be best.  It is helpful for you to know how best to handle your DOMS by listening to your own body and learning what it needs.

Posted in Exercise and Working Out | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »