Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch!

    Nia: Thurs at 9 am

    Yin Yoga: Mons at 11:30 am

    Gentle Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:30 am

    Please see my website for details! I sub for the City of San Jose and the YMCA so check my website for dates and times!

    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training!

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

  • My Bloggey Past

  • ******

    Chose a month above to visit archives, or click below to visit a page.

Posts Tagged ‘ginger’

Turmeric – Flavor With Benefits

Posted by terrepruitt on April 12, 2012

When I wrote the post regarding anti-inflammatory foods, I decided to buy some Turmeric.  At the time I was not able to claim knowing what it tasted like.  I figured since it was used a lot in curries I would be ok with it.  I thought that it would be a good thing to add to our diet.  Since there are so many things that work as an inflammatory, I am always trying to add anti-inflammatory foods and ingredients into our diet.  I wasn’t sure exactly how to use it, but I was wanting to give it a go.  Turmeric has been used in food and as medicine for centuries.  Seems like the West is doing a lot of research to see what health benefits it has.

According to the University of Maryland Medical Center:  “Turmeric has been used in both Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory, to treat digestive and liver problems, skin diseases, and wounds.  Curcumin is also a powerful antioxidant.”

Remember Curcumin is the phytochemcial that give turmeric its color.

And Eat This! has a list of 20 Health Benefits contributed to Turmeric including;

-When combined with cauliflower, it has shown to prevent prostate cancer and stop the growth of existing prostate cancer.

-Has shown promise in slowing the progression of multiple sclerosis in mice.

-May aid in fat metabolism and help in weight management.

Well, I’ve had it for a while now and I really like the flavor.  I’ve added it to soups, to veggies, and to meat.  You know my standard ground turkey and whatever veggies I have?  Well, it really makes that taste wonderful.  I had cooked broccoli, mushrooms, and ground turkey for dinner a few nights ago, today I decided to have the leftovers in a tortilla.  Since we have a few cucumbers I decided to use some up by slicing it really thin and putting it in the tortilla with the meat and a bit of parmesan cheese.  WOW!  The turmeric and the cucumbers were a party-in-my-mouth flavor.  It was really good.  So now I am going to serve cucumbers with my turmeric ground turkey.  Many people can describe flavors, I can sometimes, but I cannot describe the flavor or turmeric.  I would say that it is somewhat mellow so it won’t necessary overpower what you are using it with.  It is not hot or bitter.  I think it can be used with anything savory.     
 
Dance Exercies, Nia, Nia Campbell, Campbell Nia, Nia classes in Campbell, evening Nia, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia,Wiki says “it has a distinctly earthy, slightly bitter, slightly hot peppery flavor and a mustardy smell” but I don’t agree.  Maybe I will give it the mustardy smell, but not off the top of my head.

But there is a problem with turmeric.  It dyes everything yellow!  I now have several bowls and utensils dyed yellow because I used them to stir, serve, or store something with turmeric in it.  It is just as bad as tomato sauce when it comes to dying things!

I am familiar with turmeric in its powdered form, but it is a root like ginger, so if you get it in root form you can use it just as you would ginger.  You could chop it, grate it, cut it up . . . the same as ginger. 

If you like the flavor it seems like a great thing to add to just about everything.   Since it is touted as an anti-inflammatory, an antioxidant, help in the treatment of  inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), helps treat the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, improves liver function, prevents some cancers, lowers cholesterol, helps treat and prevent Alzheimer’s, reduces risk of childhood Leukemia among other things — why not add it to things?

Do you cook with Turmeric?  If so what do you add it to?

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Healthful Teas Can Be Yummy

Posted by terrepruitt on March 13, 2012

Dance Exercies, Nia, Nia Campbell, Campbell Nia, Nia classes in Campbell, evening Nia, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, NiaI like tea.  Do you like tea?  I like to have tea to warm me up during the day when I don’t want to have caffeine or when I don’t want to just make a hot cup of spices.  I also drink it at night for the same reason.  Herb tea in itself is said to be good for you.  Green tea is supposed to have all kinds of benefits.  I like tea and I do believe that herbal tea has benefits depending on what herb you are drinking.  Echinacea tea would fall into that category. For instance I whole heartedly believe in Echinacea being helpful when you feel you might be catching a cold.  I believe it can help you not get the cold or help make it less severe.  In the same vein I think it can help you get better faster if you are sick.  Echinacea is one of those herbs that helps with immune systems.  Whenever my husband mumbles he is not feeling well, I make sure he has a cup of Echinacea tea. I also tend to believe in the teas that claim to help with certain things (help you sleep, boost your immue system, etc).

Last October we used up the last of our Echinacea tea.  Funny I remember when it was exactly because the studio I teach Nia at had just moved.  I found myself looking around the new area one day in November.  Normally I wouldn’t remember when I bought tea but this I remember.  I wandered into a health food store.  They had a large selection of herbal tea.  My friend and I had just been having a conversation about green teas so I was looking for green teas. I wanted something to replace my Echinacea tea.  There were two I could not decide between.  But then I spotted another one and wanted that.  So I ended up getting Green Tea Triple Echinacea and a Green Tea “Super Antioxidant”.  Not sure I believe that one, but I did believe it was green tea and thought, “Well, what the heck.”

Well, they taste green.  If you are conscious of green taste you know what I mean.  I don’t think my other Echinacea tea was green tea because it didn’t taste like green.  They are ok, I like them but I kind of just save them for when I think I need them.  When I want a yummy cup of tea they are not what I think of.  Plus they have caffeine.

Not all herb tea is decaffeinated.  Green tea has caffeine.  So if you are not drinking coffee because you don’t want the caffeine and you are drinking green tea instead, you you could still be getting caffeine.  Unless it says it is decaffeinated it has caffeine.  Sometimes I don’t mind the caffeine, in fact I will drink it because of the caffeine.  But lately it has been cold here at night and I don’t want the caffeine at night.  I wanted some decaffeinated tea.  While I was buying my calcium I clicked on their tea section and found some interesting looking tea.  It is Echinacea Immune Support.  It was on sale so I took a chance.  Ahhhhh!  I am so glad I did.

Dance Exercies, Nia, Nia Campbell, Campbell Nia, Nia classes in Campbell, evening Nia, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, NiaIt has Echinacea root and Cinnamon Bark in it.  Also Cardamom Seed, Rose Hip, Ginger Root, and Elderberry Extract among other things.  This is not a green tea, but it has other things I like, for instance a yummy taste.  It is really good.  This tea is one that I think of drinking when I want to have a warm cozy cup of tea.  The moment I ripped open the little package I was intrigued by the delicious smell.

Echinacea is good for fighting colds.  Cinnamon and cardamom are anti-inflammatory spices.  Rose hips is high in Vitamin C so it has anti-oxidants.  Ginger can help with chronic inflammation and digestion.  And I just learned about Elderberry being an immune system boost.  So, with all the ingredients in here that I am familiar with I can concede its claim to be Immune Support.  Even if not, it is a good cup of tea.

Do you drink tea?  Do you drink herb tea?  Do you drink herb tea for health benefits?  What is your favorite tea? 

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Natural Appetite Suppressants

Posted by terrepruitt on January 31, 2012

Almonds – They have everything good in a meal; carbohydrates, fiber, fat, protein, vitamins, and minerals.  If you don’t have a nut allergy they are a great snack.

Water –  If you drink water you feel full.  In fact research has stated that sometimes the body indicates dehydration as hunger.  So it could be that you are not really hungry but dehydrated and in need of water.

Ginger – Is also an appetite suppressant.  Not only does it help suppress, but as mentioned on my blog before it helps with digestion once you do eat.

Avocado – Studies have shown that the body converts an acid contained in the avocado to a hormone that increases the feeling of satiety and fullness. But just as with almonds they do contain a high amount of fat so the key is still moderation.

Coffee – The caffeine, coffee stimulates the central nervous system and can suppresses the appetite.  Suppressing the appetite yet drinking  a lot of cream and sugar might not give you the result you want, so black coffee could be the answer.  Don’t drink too much because then you could get jittery AND hungry!  

Apples – With the fiber and the bulk an apple can help fill you up and help with regulating your system.

Sweet Potatoes – As a complex carbohydrate a sweet potato can give you the feeling of fullness and sustained energy.

Tofu – Studies have shown that the hormone peptide is an appetite suppressant. Tofu is a great source of protein and it is protein that is responsible for the release of this hormone.  Helps explain why a breakfast with protein keeps you feeling full longer than one just full of simple carbohydrates. 

Wasabi – Some say spicy foods make you feel full.  If you like hot and spicy you can be the judge.

Green Tea – Research has proven that green tea helps you feel full.  As with all of these listed, it really is up to you and what you think, but I am sure you have heard about the other benefits of green tea with its anti-oxidants.  Remember unless you get decaffeinated green tea, it does have caffeine.
 
Oatmeal – Slow cook oatmeal has a lot of fiber.  Fiber helps you feel full and stay full.

Green leafy veggies –  With leafy greens it is fiber and the fact that you can eat a lot and actually GET full!  So leafy greens actually fill you AND suppress the appetite.

Salmon – Salmon has Omega 3, fat helps you feel full.  It also has protein. 

Flax Seeds – Omega 3 and fiber.  A winning combination.

Cinnamon – Since cinnamon helps stabilize blood sugar and there is a link between hunger and blood sugar levels, it is logical that cinnamon would help suppress or at least help stabilize the feeling of being hungry or full.

Pine Nuts – Remember, we have already said that protein helps suppress the appetite, well, Pine nuts contain the highest amount of protein of any nut or seed. They also affect the hormones that work to signal the brain that you’re no longer hungry.

Some of these can be eaten as a snack in between meals to help you from being too hungry and maybe eating something unhealthy.  Or then can be added to a meal to help you feel more satisfied and stay full longer.  Or you can combine them to help you keep from in between meal snacking. 

You can add wasabi to your salmon.  Throw some flax seeds, pine nuts, or almonds on your leafy greens.  Sprinkle some cinnamon in your coffee.  Add some ginger to your water.  Apple in your oatmeal.  Avocado and tofu?  Either way you have some health natural ways to suppress your appetite and/or keeping you feeling full and satisfied.  What do you think?

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Chinese Dumpling Soup – Super Easy Soup

Posted by terrepruitt on November 12, 2011

I have been slowly learning a new Nia routine.  I worked on it this morning then right before dinner I decided to do a few of the katas that I are challenging me.  I knew that dinner would be easy because it is FINALLY soup weather in San Jose, California and I made Chinese Dumpling Soup last night and I was just going to add a little more broth.  Well, I ended up adding a little more than that.  After I first had this soup, which I first mentioned in my Ginger post, I wanted it again.  I made it once and I wanted to post about it then because it is so good.  But normally I only like to post recipes when I made adjustments so it can be more like my own and not like I am just copying someone else’s recipe, but I really haven’t made any adjustments to this soup.  It is so good.  This time I did add some mushrooms.  Ya know, have you ever had that soup at a Chinese food restaurant with paper-thin mushrooms in it?  That is what I was thinking of so I sliced some mushrooms and put them in the original cooking and them more tonight when I added more broth and more spinach.  This soup has so many flavors going on it is really a wonderful thing.  I am going to make it and eat it without the dumplings (pot stickers).  My hubby doesn’t want me to omit the pot stickers, but it is such good soup he will forgive me.  I know he will.

Chinese Dumpling Soup

Ingredients
8 cups water
8 teaspoons Better Than Bouillon low sodium chicken bouillon
2 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and chopped
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/4 cup rice vinegar (although you can use sherry, which I am sure I will have to do one day)
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1 teaspoon sugar
sprinkle of salt
about 1 cup Julienne baby carrots
24 frozen Chinese dumplings
3 scallions (white and green parts), thinly sliced
4 cups bag baby spinach

Directions

Heat the eight cups water, stir in the 8 teaspoons of bouillon.  Add the ginger, soy, wine, vinegar, sesame oil, and sugar.  Bring to a boil. Lower the heat and let simmer for about 10 minutes.

Add the dumplings and cook for about 5 minutes.  You might want to adjust the heat up a bit since the frozen dumplings will bring the temperature of the liquid way down.

Add the carrots (I like them crunchy).  Turn the heat down a bit and cook for about two minutes.

Then add the spinach, sprinkle the salt in, and add the scallions.  Let the spinach wilt, about a minute.

Get your taste buds ready for some super yumminess and serve.

dance exercise, Nia teacher, Easy Soup, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia classes, Nia classes in the Bay AreaWell, now that I have typed it up, the directions on the site are a bit different than mine, I am sharing with you the way I do it.  But basically it is from the Food Network Cookbook and website.  I don’t like my carrots really cooked so I add them after the dumplings where the site and the book say to add them before and cook them longer.  The site also suggest cooking the soup without the pot stickers and just have them on the side.  That is what I am going to do.  If my hubby wants them in the soup he can put them in there.  The way I cook them added them to the soup would add ANOTHER layer of flavor and probably make it better anyway.

The soup is really, really, really easy and without the dumplings is has to be really low in fat.  With the spinach you are getting a good amount of greens.  YUM.  This soup is really good.  One of those foods that has you thinking about it.

Well, the recipe this book came from is from a book I bought for my friend and she has made a few recipes in it for me and they have been really good.  I would recommend this book to anyone that likes to use cookbooks.  What made me get it for her is that there were simple recipes in it (she has kids) and because it shows “additional uses” for some of the ingredients you might not know what to do with.  If you buy a can of tomato paste and use two teaspoons, it shows you other recipes in the book that also use tomato paste.  I thought that was so cool because I often end up with leftover ingredients.  As it turns out I love this book because it has this soup recipe in it and I love this soup.

I hope you will try it and enjoy it too.  If you do let me know what you think.

Posted in "Recipes", Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Ginger, the Root

Posted by terrepruitt on September 20, 2011

Whenever I think of ginger I think of that thin pale pink wet looking stuff that is put on the plate next to the wasabi when sushi and sashimi is served.  I have never been draw to that pale-watery-skin-looking pile.  In fact I thought I didn’t like ginger because of that stuff.  I believe that is pickled ginger.  It is a bit on the spicy side.  I don’t like spicy heat at all.  I don’t even use pepper.  Not too long ago I visited a friend and she said she was going to make soup.  This was her first time making this particular soup.  It has ginger in it.  She asked if I like ginger and I think I told her I was ok with it.  Well, it turns out I really liked the soup.  I believe that one of the reasons I like the soup was because of the ginger.  It gave it a great flavor.  I have been waiting for it to get cold here in the Bay Area so I could make the soup because I have been craving it.  It cooled down one day so I thought that was the start of our cool weather so I decided to make the soup.  But I had to wait a few days because dinner plans were already made a few days out.  So, of course the day I decide to make it the temperatures are in the high 80s maybe even the 90s, but I was determined.  I made it, it came out really good.  My hubby loved it.  So now we have another dish to add to our dinner menus.  And it is something we can eat ginger in.

Of course, while I was cutting up the ginger I began to wonder about it.  What is its nutritional value if any?

According to WHFoods  1 oz has less than 5% of the RDA of potassium, magnesium, copper, maganeses, vitamin B6.

Even without a lot of nutrients it is a very effective digestive aid.  Some material I read even suggested that as one of the reason it is served with raw fish.  It has been used for over 2,000 years to treat stomach related issues.

I had heard a long time ago that it is good to help relieve nausea. It can help both the motion sick such as car sickness, air and sea sickness.  It also aids in relieving the morning sickness.  Some studies have shown that a little as a gram of ginger helps relieve vomiting associated with morning sickness.  There are even recent studies that suggest ginger relieves some of the sickness associated with chemotherapy.

Since ginger is considered an anti-inflammatory, it is not surprising to hear that it is thought to help people with inflammatory issues, such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.  Both the pain and the swelling have been documented as being less when ginger is included in the diet.

Some studies also show that ginger may help in stopping the growth of cancer cells.  Which isn’t surprising when at the same time it is thought that a state of constant/chronic inflammation helps contribute to the growth of cancer cells.  It seems more and more things that are found to help “fight”/”prevent”/”disable” cancer are the ones that also help with inflammation.  Inflammation is the body’s immune response it should not be a chronic state in the body.

Even more studies hint at ginger being an immune booster.  So really what have you got to lose with adding it to your diet?

Do you like fresh ginger?  If so, how do you use it?  Please share as I am just learning how to eat this amazing root.

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments »

Terre-yaki Sauce

Posted by terrepruitt on April 7, 2011

Ok, so I haven’t made it yet, and I didn’t make up the recipe, but I plan on making it.  I found my instructions for my immersion blender.  It is an old one.  It is a Thane Thunder Stick Pro.  I can’t find the year on the instructions, but I know that I bought it since I’ve lived here.  That has been within the last 12 years.  Ha!  I know they have improved since then.  If I end up using it as much as I hope I will just have to get a new one.

Anyway, the recipe for teriyaki sauce is as follows:

 

I will definitely experiment with this because I will avoid the “artificial sweetener” and MSG.  I might just try the below recipe from allrecipes.com.

2/3 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup cooking sherry
2 tablespoons white sugar
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 clove garlic, minced

I am sure someone has mentioned to me to make my own teriyaki because I LOVE teriyaki and I don’t like the High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) used in the brand I normally by.  I had a friend call me recently to tell me of a brand that didn’t have HFCS but the choices were spicy and ginger or something.

So, I will just try to make my own.  Not that I have to use the blender, but why not?

Do you like teriyaki?

Posted in "Recipes", Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Anti-Inflammation Foods

Posted by terrepruitt on November 2, 2010

I did a post on inflammation, listing a few things that might contribute to chronic inflammation. A state that stresses the delicate balance of the body. It really seems as if overly processed foods and fast foods are the culprits which is just more reasons to avoid foods of that nature. There are some foods that studies have shown that help fight inflammation, foods we can call “anti-inflammation foods” per se.

Omega 3 oil cold water fish (salmon, mackerel, anchovies, herring, sardines)

Grass feed beef

Sweet potatoes

Onions

Olive oil

Hemp Oil

Broccoli

Cauliflower

Brussels sprouts

Kale

Cherries

Blue berries

Mangos

Turmeric

Ginger

Garlic

Cinnamon

Apples

Red grapes

Carrots

Green leafy vegetables; dark green leaf lettuce, spinach, collard greens, turnip greens, mustard greens.

Now please keep in mind this is just a partial list. Everyone is different and with so many different bodies, one needs to take what they read and realize that it will not work for everyone. You have to work on yourself and your own diet. See how you feel when you cut some of the “inflammatory foods” out of your diet and add some of the “anti-inflammatory” foods in.

I teach Nia classes because I believe, in addition to food that helps, movement/exercise/being active helps.  I want to help people.

Again food that might help the immune system balance itself and not react with inflammation, something worth thinking about.

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »