Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch! SIX group classes a week!

    Nia: Tues and Thurs at 9 am, Fri at 10:15 am

    Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:15 am

    Please see my website for details! I sub for the City of San Jose and the YMCA so check my website for dates and times!

    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training!

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Posts Tagged ‘Inflammation’

Watermelon

Posted by terrepruitt on September 17, 2018

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFit, City of San Jose Exercise ClassesIn this past organic produce delivery there was a little watermelon. They call them personal watermelons. They are so cute. I decided to slice it open, cut it up, and put it in the fridge. Wow. It is a very good melon. Since watermelons have so much water in them I don’t think of them as having much nutritional value, but a quick internet search shows that they aren’t just water.

Red and pink fruits and veggies contain lycopene which is an antioxidant. Studies suggest it can help reduce the risks of getting asthma and cancer. Antioxidants help fight the formation of free radicals known to cause cancer. Watermelon may help protect against heart disease, while a study showed a supplement of watermelon extract helped with high blood pressure. Lycopene is also thought to help act as a sunscreen. With watermelon being over 90% water, it can help keep things moving in the digestive system.

Vitamin A contained in watermelon can help your skin and eyes. While Choline, an essential nutrient that is naturally present in some foods, helps with metabolism, among other things, and may help with chronic inflammation. And beta-cryptoxanthin may help protect against inflammation.

According to the International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences watermelon is high in protein, magnesium, and vitamin B.

Dance Exercise, Nia, Nia in the City of San Jose, Nia classes in the South Bay, Nia Teacher, Nia Class, San Jose Nia, Nia San Jose, Nia workout, Nia, Gentle Yoga, Group Ex classes, YMCA, Zumba, Nia Technique, SJ City Fit, SJCityFit, City of San Jose Exercise ClassesNutrition facts

Serving size: 2 cups diced (10 oz / 280 g)
Calories: 80 (Calories from Fat 0)

Total Fat: 0g

Total Carbohydrate: 21g
Dietary Fiber: 1g
Sugars: 20g

Cholesterol: 0mg
Sodium: 0mg
Potassium: 270mg
Protein: 1g

Vitamin A: 30%
Vitamin C: 25%
Calcium: 2%
Iron: 4%

Percent Daily Values (%DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet

I have a post where I suggest adding watermelon to you salad greens, specifically, arugula

Information also says that while watermelon might seem high in carbohydrates, is has a glycemic index (GI) value of 80 and its glycemic load is a 5.  So it is not a bad sweet.

I know two people who don’t like watermelon and I find that very odd.  I pretty much think EVERYONE likes watermelon.  These benefits seem to make it a good snack.

What do you think?  Do you like watermelon?  Do you cook with it?  How do you eat it?

Posted in Food, Fruit | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

At Home Health Information Tests

Posted by terrepruitt on August 28, 2014

One of my Nia students gave me a catalog today after Nia class that had information in it about a new device.  I have been saying for a while we need something like this.  I am not saying this is it, but I am saying this is very interesting.  I think this is really the start of something.  This is something that — if used properly — could really help people be more in control of their health and wellness.  Now, I know a lot of people who can practically do this on their own, without a fancy machine.  But not everyone is THAT in tune with their body.  Not everyone knows what little signs the body gives means.  This is something that fascinates me because it COULD be very helpful.  Unfortunately with everything, I am certain the information will be used as a marketing tool and therefore take away from the good (in my opinion) it could do, but we will see.  I would also imagine different/additional tests to be helpful.  It is very interesting and it is a start.  It is a device called Cue.

Cue is a little cube that takes a biological sample using specific cartridges and processes it into information you can use to make decisions about your diet and what actions you can take to adjust the readings.  It looks as if right now the information it can give feedback on is “Vitamin D”, “Inflammation”, “Influenza”, “Testosterone”, and “Fertility”.

I noticed that on the video, it showed the woman was deficient in Vitamin D.  That makes sense, it can test for that.  The flu virus is another one I understand along with testosterone, the device can detect the virus as it can detect levels of testosterone.  It tests for the luteinizing hormone with the “Fertility” cartridge.  It does not say how they determine the body’s level of inflammation.  I would imagine they are testing for a specific level of protein with a blood test.  But I cannot find information on the site that explains exactly how this thing works and what exactly they are testing for.

I find it very interesting.

I know there are presently at home tests where you can test for fertility, but I think the thing with the Cue would be tracking and documenting.  And possibly even alerting you with reminders and things.  “Hey, don’t forget tonight is the night . . . ”  for the female (who cares to do so) “better shave your legs” and for the male who wants to be romantic “stop at the flower shop”.  Ok, so I am going off of commercials I see regarding other devices . . . but I would bet there are alerts, probably not so detailed, but who knows?

I don’t care for the information being sent wirelessly, but that is because I wouldn’t want my information floating about.  🙂  I am also not crazy about the Flumap . . . again, some of the aspects of this could be abused . . . basically like anything.

The cartridges are all single use and they come in packs of five.  A five pack of ONE test.  So you would get five of the vitamin D test.  And not one of each.  The packs are presently priced at $20.00.  Oh, except the flu, that is a THREE pack for $30.00.  The tests (per the website) are as follows:

For an Inflammation test, Cue requires a droplet of blood.
For a Vitamin D test, Cue requires a droplet of blood.
For an Influenza test, Cue requires cellular material from the nostril.
For a Testosterone test, Cue requires a few droplets of saliva.
For a Fertility test, Cue requires a droplet of blood.

So, what do you think?  Do you think this sounds interesting?  Would you be interesting in use something like this?  Would you be interested in one of the present tests?  What would you like it to test for?

 

Posted in Misc | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Sneezing, Itching, and Being Stuffy

Posted by terrepruitt on November 16, 2013

I have allergies, hay fever some people call it.  It is there all year round, but worse or “more active” during specific times of the year.  Spring is a really sneezy time of year.  Also anytime it rains and then there is sun right after.  Also when it first starts to rain in the winter.  And for about 10 years, during the month of March and the month of October, I can barely be around my cat.  Just 30 seconds in her vicinity will set me off on a sneezing jag.  The months that I am hyper sensitive to her have fluctuated the past three years.  At this time, mid-November, I am having some lengthy sessions of sneezing after I get my snuggles in.  As far as I know I have always been sensitive to cats and dogs, but that doesn’t stop me from having one and wanting one.  It is just something I deal with.  I used to take a combination decongestant-antihistamine every night, but now it is so difficult to get one.  I feel as if I am a criminal by having to go to the pharmacist and be registered.  Forget that.  After they made it annoyingly difficult I would just purchase the antihistamines and for a long time I took that every night.  Then I stopped.  Now I just take it when my nose is so raw from rubbing it and sneezing that it hurts when I touch it.  A few months ago I had a thought during one of my multi-sneeze sneezing jags.  I thought I would ask you guys about it.  Can a gluten sensitivity present as hay fever?

I have been resistant to jumping on the band wagon and claiming I have a sensitivity to gluten.  I know many people who have obvious and more annoying symptoms.  I know that a sensitivity and actually being allergic to gluten/Celiac Disease is very serious so I never really thought that my sneezing, congestion, itchiness, and inflammation could be because of a gluten sensitivity.  But now I am thinking about it.  Could it be?

If the wheat that is in our food supply and food “stuffs” is something that is barely related to the wheat of the past and it it being blamed for all types of health issues and primarily inflammation in the body it would make sense that gluten or wheat is causing allergy symptoms.  Could it be the gluten is causing the allergy symptoms?

Or maybe the gluten is causing other “issues” (such as inflammation) in my body that does not allow my body to fight off the offending pollens so I end up having allergy attacks.  Hmmmm . . . .That could be it.

But . . . . one of the reasons I had not linked it to gluten is I usually am ok in air conditioning.  Hmmm . . . I just thought of that . . . . I have not been in air conditioning that much lately.  When I am teaching a Nia class and I can turn the air on, it seems better.  See, it is really difficult to pinpoint.

What do you think?  Do any of you have issues with “hay fever”?  Do you think it is tied to gluten?  Have you don’t any type of experimentation?  Does anyone have this issue?

Posted in Misc | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Glancing At Two Gastrointestinal Disorders

Posted by terrepruitt on November 7, 2013

As you know I am a Nia teacher not a doctor nor a medical professional, but I would like to share some things with you because it seems the situation is becoming more and more prevalent in the population.  I thought I would point out a few things so we can learn the difference and try to keep it straight.  I am talking about gut problems.  Stomach, intestines, and colon issues.  I talk to more and more people who are having issues.  You might even be aware of the fact that my cat has an issue.  Now, I am not going to get into what might be the cause of the issues because that is very complex and I think it relates to the individual.  Plus you probably already know that I believe much of our food “stuff” is partially responsible for ALL of our health issues.  This post though is just to help shed some light on the terms and letters you might be hearing.  Specifically, IBS and IBD!  What do those letters stand for:  IBS is Irritable Bowel Syndrome and IBD is Inflammatory Bowel Disease.  They are not the same thing.  And I don’t think you want one over the other.  They are just something no one wants.

Keep in mind I am just sharing what I have gleaned off the internet, so yes, the information could be faulty, but you might agree it makes sense.  Also, keep in mind that this post, nor anything you read on the internet–including my blog–should not be used to diagnose a situation.  Go to a medical professional for that.  This article just might help you learn somethings that will allow you to ask the right questions or perhaps point you in the right direction to get a diagnosis (from a professional) and work on the treatment you need.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome/IBS and Inflammatory Bowel Disease/IBD are gastrointestinal disorders.  The symptoms might present the same, but they are not the same . . . although some people think that you can have IBS if you have IBD.  With IBS the doctor might not see anything wrong.  The bowels appear normal, but they are not functioning normal and more than likely are causing pain and discomfort.  With IBD, the intestines do not appear normal they are inflamed and do not function as they should.  With IBD the entire digestive tract could be affected by inflammation.

IBS is considered a “functional disorder”, things look fine, but don’t operate fine.  With IBD there is damage and the damage keeps the body from absorbing the necessary nutrients.  A little like a gluten intolerance might cause pain and discomfort and Celiacs Disease keeps the body from getting what it needs from food.  IBD is an autoimmune disease, where the body’s immune system is on overdrive and ends up doing damage to the very thing (the body) it is supposed to protect.

The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America’s website states researchers are leaning away from the idea that stress CAUSES IBS, they now believe it has to do with a “disturbance in the way the brain and the gut interact”.  They think the nerve endings in the gut are overly sensitive and the controlling nerves are over active.

The cause of IBD is unknown.

Both disorders have digestive issues associated with them, and both can also have additional health issues arise in connection with the disorder.  There you have it, a really quick glance at the main difference between Irritable Bowel Syndrome/IBS and Inflammatory Bowel Disease/IBD.  Both have similar symptoms, but IBS does not have inflammation and show signs of damage, whereas the digestive tract with IBD is does.

What do you have to share about IBS/IBD?

Posted in Misc | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Nightshade Vegetables So Good, Yet May Be Bad

Posted by terrepruitt on November 3, 2011

When I first started looking into different types of diets (READ:  NUTRITION PLAN/WAY OF EATING), I was curious to always see Nightshade Vegetables mentioned.  One diet that I have talked about is the anti-inflammation diet, this diet does not contain nightshade vegetables. You might know what they are and what that means, but I have mentioned before that I am not a gardener.  I am not a gardener and even more so I have no idea about vegetable families and their classifications and stuff.    I keep having to look it up.  What is a nightshade vegetable?  Nia teacher, Nia classes, Nia dance, Nia cardio, Nia workout, Nia, Nia fitnessNightshade vegetables are from the Solanaceae Family.  Nightshade vegetables contain a group of chemicals found in plants called alkaloids.  There are different types of plant alkaloids, some being toxic.  Plants containing alkaloids have been used for medicinal purposes as well as stimulates and poisons.  Studies have proven that alkaloids can affect some of the functions in the body.  Some people are more susceptible than others.  These vegetables are thought to interfere with digestion, muscles, and joints.  Nightshade vegetables promote inflammation in the body.

If you are susceptible to them it might be beneficial to limit consumption of these types of veggies.  As I mentioned if you are on an anti-inflammation diet they might be forbidden all together.  Again this could only be if you are sensitive to them.  Or if you are interested in trying to reduce the amount of chronic inflammation in the body.  If you have arthritis or any other disease associated with chronic inflammation it might be something to try. Or if you experience pain caused by sensitive nerves.

Nightshade vegetables are very common.  They are so common it kind of makes sense that chronic inflammation is more prevalent and being study by the medical profession.  I think the most common nightshade veggies are potatoes, tomatoes, and bell peppers.  You know I LOVE bell peppers and I was just learning to like tomatoes.  And the issue with potatoes is they are yummy in so many forms; mashed, fried, baked, roasted.  In addition to my beloved bell pepper ALL peppers are lumped in this family.  So even the hot ones that might aid in digestion could be causing inflammation issues.

In addition to inflammation there is research has proved that the alkaloid in potatoes interrupt signals from nerves to muscles and might contribute to muscle twitches.  Next time you have a twitch try to remember if you had any potatoes.  In addition to signal interruption, the chemicals contained in some nightshade vegetables might even cause pain  Also some research has shown that the alkaloids leech calcium out of bones and deposit it into soft tissue.

Eggplant is also a nightshade vegetable.  I love roasted eggplant.  Eggplant along with tomatoes contain nicotine.  Yup, tobacco is a nightshade plant and nicotine is an alkaloid.  It is fortunate that both tomatoes and eggplant contain a lot less nicotine then tobacco, it is still interesting to know.

Cooking reduces the level of alkaloids in our veggies by about 40-50%.

Please note that I am not saying that any health issue or discomfort you are experiencing is caused by nightshade vegetables/food.  What I am saying is that some research has either proved or associated the alkaloids in nightshade vegetables/foods to be connected to certain things; inflammation, digestive issues, nervous system malfunctions, pain, muscle twitching, etc. and it is interesting to know.  And it might be beneficial to do some experimenting with your diet if you think you might be sensitive to the chemicals found in some of the vegetables and/or spices considered nightshade foods.

Did you know what veggies were considered nightshade?  I am glad that I now have this list.

Posted in Food, Vegetables | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Ginger, the Root

Posted by terrepruitt on September 20, 2011

Whenever I think of ginger I think of that thin pale pink wet looking stuff that is put on the plate next to the wasabi when sushi and sashimi is served.  I have never been draw to that pale-watery-skin-looking pile.  In fact I thought I didn’t like ginger because of that stuff.  I believe that is pickled ginger.  It is a bit on the spicy side.  I don’t like spicy heat at all.  I don’t even use pepper.  Not too long ago I visited a friend and she said she was going to make soup.  This was her first time making this particular soup.  It has ginger in it.  She asked if I like ginger and I think I told her I was ok with it.  Well, it turns out I really liked the soup.  I believe that one of the reasons I like the soup was because of the ginger.  It gave it a great flavor.  I have been waiting for it to get cold here in the Bay Area so I could make the soup because I have been craving it.  It cooled down one day so I thought that was the start of our cool weather so I decided to make the soup.  But I had to wait a few days because dinner plans were already made a few days out.  So, of course the day I decide to make it the temperatures are in the high 80s maybe even the 90s, but I was determined.  I made it, it came out really good.  My hubby loved it.  So now we have another dish to add to our dinner menus.  And it is something we can eat ginger in.

Of course, while I was cutting up the ginger I began to wonder about it.  What is its nutritional value if any?

According to WHFoods  1 oz has less than 5% of the RDA of potassium, magnesium, copper, maganeses, vitamin B6.

Even without a lot of nutrients it is a very effective digestive aid.  Some material I read even suggested that as one of the reason it is served with raw fish.  It has been used for over 2,000 years to treat stomach related issues.

I had heard a long time ago that it is good to help relieve nausea. It can help both the motion sick such as car sickness, air and sea sickness.  It also aids in relieving the morning sickness.  Some studies have shown that a little as a gram of ginger helps relieve vomiting associated with morning sickness.  There are even recent studies that suggest ginger relieves some of the sickness associated with chemotherapy.

Since ginger is considered an anti-inflammatory, it is not surprising to hear that it is thought to help people with inflammatory issues, such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.  Both the pain and the swelling have been documented as being less when ginger is included in the diet.

Some studies also show that ginger may help in stopping the growth of cancer cells.  Which isn’t surprising when at the same time it is thought that a state of constant/chronic inflammation helps contribute to the growth of cancer cells.  It seems more and more things that are found to help “fight”/”prevent”/”disable” cancer are the ones that also help with inflammation.  Inflammation is the body’s immune response it should not be a chronic state in the body.

Even more studies hint at ginger being an immune booster.  So really what have you got to lose with adding it to your diet?

Do you like fresh ginger?  If so, how do you use it?  Please share as I am just learning how to eat this amazing root.

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments »

Anti-Inflammation Diet

Posted by terrepruitt on April 23, 2011

You know that the body being in a constant state of inflammation is not good, right?  Research and studies are relating this state of being to many diseases.  You know there are foods that have an anti-inflammatory effect on the body.  Do you know that there are foods that cause an inflammatory response in the body?

It is thought that foods that cause an allergic reaction are related to inflammation.  Since inflammation is an immune response.  One of the food groups to be avoided when on a nutrition plan to reduce inflammation in the body is dairy.  Dairy is a big allergy culprit so milk, cheese, and yogurt would not be included in this type of diet.  Although I love dairy this seems like one of the easiest things to avoid.

Another allergy food is peanuts.  This food is definitely not on the list of “can eat” if following an anti-inflammatory eating plan.  This food seems like it might be a little bit more difficult to avoid.  I would imagine if it is just being avoided with the idea to reduce inflammation it would not be so imperative to avoid things that are made in plants with peanuts as one has to do if they are highly allergic.

This diet also excludes caffeine and alcohol.  Strict adherence would entail no fried foods, no processed foods, and no corn.  I think the really difficult allergen to avoid is gluten.  It seems to be in so many things.  Things I wouldn’t have even thought of.  Since so many people are participating in gluten-free diets I have since learned a few of the things, but still.  It is in so many things it seems difficult to avoid.  Just like the items on my list*.  It is difficult to avoid them.   I keep wondering what there is so eat on a diet like this.

This diet is thought to help so many health issues.  Again from what I have seen it is thought that a constant state of inflammation is bad for the body.  It is thought that this state is a state in which diseases can infiltrate the body and its systems.  So if there are health issues I can see following this if it help relieve some of the symptoms of a particular disease.  But this type of diet is also used as a detox and to see if any of these foods cause a reaction in the body.  The plan is to not eat these foods for about two weeks then introduce them back into the diet and to check the reactions of the body.

I want to try this detox/elimination diet to see if there are some food that I should definitely cut out of my diet.  I can live without all of this for two weeks, but the gluten.  It is in so many things.  Well, I am going to research it further.  I am sure I will be posting more about this in the future, but I wanted to see what you think.

I know some of you follow gluten-free diets?  So if you follow a gluten-free diet, why?  And what do you notice, what differences in your body?  And what do you eat instead of bread?  Are they any of you that follow an anti-inflammation diet?  Please share.

*Currently my list of ingredients to avoid:  High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) or Corn sugar, partially hydrogenated oils, and Canola Oil

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments »

Anti-Inflammation Foods

Posted by terrepruitt on November 2, 2010

I did a post on inflammation, listing a few things that might contribute to chronic inflammation. A state that stresses the delicate balance of the body. It really seems as if overly processed foods and fast foods are the culprits which is just more reasons to avoid foods of that nature. There are some foods that studies have shown that help fight inflammation, foods we can call “anti-inflammation foods” per se.

Omega 3 oil cold water fish (salmon, mackerel, anchovies, herring, sardines)

Grass feed beef

Sweet potatoes

Onions

Olive oil

Hemp Oil

Broccoli

Cauliflower

Brussels sprouts

Kale

Cherries

Blue berries

Mangos

Turmeric

Ginger

Garlic

Cinnamon

Apples

Red grapes

Carrots

Green leafy vegetables; dark green leaf lettuce, spinach, collard greens, turnip greens, mustard greens.

Now please keep in mind this is just a partial list. Everyone is different and with so many different bodies, one needs to take what they read and realize that it will not work for everyone. You have to work on yourself and your own diet. See how you feel when you cut some of the “inflammatory foods” out of your diet and add some of the “anti-inflammatory” foods in.

I teach Nia classes because I believe, in addition to food that helps, movement/exercise/being active helps.  I want to help people.

Again food that might help the immune system balance itself and not react with inflammation, something worth thinking about.

Posted in Food | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Inflammation

Posted by terrepruitt on October 30, 2010

Inflammation is a good thing . . . . normally, when it is acute.  When it happens in response to an injury, or bacteria, or when it is fighting an infection.  When it does its job and helps the body heal it is amazing.  But chronic inflammation is not a good thing.  When the immune system is a little off and there is constant inflammation in the body it is not good.  The body should not be in this state of “fight” for prolong periods.  It should fight the issue and then go back to a normal state, but it does not always do this. 

Constant or chronic inflammation is the cause of conditions such as arthritis, and it is being linked to many illnesses/diseases including; autoimmune diseases, obesity, hay fever, diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, osteoporosis, wrinkling skin, and even depression . . . to name a few.  It is as if our immune system is working overtime and not allowing our body or body’s system to be in balance. 

Some things thought to contribute to inflammation:  our diet, our habits, and our environment.  Trans fat, saturated fats, omega 6 fat, refined sugar, and simple carbohydrates are things contained in our diets and could be pushing our immune systems into an unhealthy state of being.  Even eating more protein, carbohydrates, and fat than we need is suggested to contribute to inflammation.  Lack of exercise is a contributing factor, along with smoking, and stress.  The toxins in our homes and work places, in all of our lives could be additional factors.  When you add all of that up we are literally assaulted daily.  It is no wonder our bodies can’t fight off all of the diseases and the diseases are on the rise.  It is no wonder that more and more people are being diagnosed with autoimmune diseases–our bodies are fighting themselves.

To me, its something to think about.

Posted in Just stuff | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »