Terre Pruitt's Blog

In the realm of health, wellness, fitness, and the like, or whatever inspires me.

  • I teach Nia, yoga and stretch!

    Nia: Thurs at 9 am

    Yin Yoga: Mons at 11:30 am

    Gentle Yoga: Tues at 10:30 am and Thurs at 6:00 pm

    Stretch: Thurs at 10:30 am

    Please see my website for details! I sub for the City of San Jose and the YMCA so check my website for dates and times!

    I am also available for private Nia / yoga / Personal Training!

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  • My Bloggey Past

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Posts Tagged ‘White Belt’

First I Went Green, Now I’m Going Blue

Posted by terrepruitt on October 9, 2012

As I have shared with you before, there are four different levels to Nia Training; White, Blue, Brown, Black.  These are trainings anyone can take.  Each level has its own focus, intent, and principles.  You do not have to be interested in teaching.  If you are interested in teaching and hold a current license there is an additional level, Green, that may be taken.  The Green belt does not have its own principles because it focuses on teaching skills.  I have been a White Belt since December 2008.  In November 2012, I am going to be turning blue.  The focus for the Blue Belt is Communication, Relationship and Intimacy with the intent to energize personal connection through self-discovery and communication by following The Body’s Way.  I’m excited to see all that entails.  I do know that when I stepped into my White Belt I had NO IDEA the type of training I would be receiving.  I thought that I would spend 40 hours learning routines and learning how to teach.  But that is not what it was.  The White Belt is currently about (Focus) physical sensation with the intent to embody the foundation of Nia.  Back in 2008 is was (focus) the physical body, the anatomy of the body, the Nia Technique, and the Nia moves.  Which did not equate to learning routines.  I can’t wait to see what the Blue Belt Intensive has in store.

Nia’s training is very intense.  It is very deep.  It is very detailed, well-thought out, well presented, and well documented.  Recently a graduating Green Belt said it was “stellar”.  That is a great description.

Per the main Nia website the description for the Blue Belt states:

Blue Belt, the second level of Nia education, explores how to create healthy relationships through body-centered communication. This intensive introduces the next set of 13 Nia principles, which focus on the mental, emotional and spiritual realms of the body. While the White Belt curriculum focuses entirely on awareness of physical sensation, Blue Belt applies these skills to explore internal sensations as perceived through – but distinct from – physical sensations in the body.

Blue Belt Principle #1: The Joy of Being in Relationship, integrates the sensation of Joy with the awareness that Joy is something outside the self, which we can invite into our physical experience. As a result, we begin to deepen our ability to listen with clarity and sustain awareness of details outside our body.

If you have never been to a Nia Intensive it is impossible to describe, but I know it will be wonderful.  I know I will learn a lot.  I know that it is what I need because it is happening, so I am going to do my best to keep my energy allies present along with having a beginner’s mind so that I am able to get all that I can out of it.  You know that I will be sharing a lot when I get back.  I am so excited to be changing from White to Blue.  Just because I am moving to the next level doesn’t mean there won’t more posts about White Belt things, there is still a lot to share and learn about the White Belt, I will just have that much more to share!

Can I get a, “Woohoo Blue!”

**update:  I forgot to clarify and tie in to my title, silly me!  First I went Green as in drinking green smoothies and now I am going Blue.  I have not yet taken the Nia Green Belt.  I am hoping that there will be one in this area again.  There has only been one.

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Three of Nia’s Nine Movement Forms

Posted by terrepruitt on March 12, 2011

I believe that I have mentioned before Nia allows us—even encourages us—to do routines with different focuses. I know I have posted about focuses before. This past week I led my classes in the Nia routine called Sanjana. I believe this is a routine created by Debbie Rosas NKA Debbie Rosas-Stewart. It is an awesome routine (well, yeah . . . its Nia). I decided that I would do one of the nine movement forms per class. I know I have posted about Nia’s Nine Movement Forms before, too.  I had used some of the movement forms previously with this routine, so I decided the ones we did this week would be ones I had not paired up with Sanjana. Monday in my San Jose Nia class we did the ideas of Moshe Feldenkrais. For Wednesdays Nia class in San Jose we utilized the energy of Tae Kwon Do. My Los Gatos class on Friday experienced Sanjana with the Modern Dance flair.

I love this about Nia. I love that doing the same routine, but doing it with different energies allows for different movement, different sensations. Each movement form has its own energy, that is how we apply them to a routine and come up with something unique. I chose Feldenkrais for Monday because often times participants are a bit sleepy on Monday mornings.  Sometimes we prefer something that moves us but something more along the lines of a stretch or a healing art.  It could be that too much was done over the weekend or not enough, so Mondays are a little different.  With this conscious movement as our guide we were able to focus on the sensation of the body as we moved. The dance was conscious.  We could concentrate on areas that needed attention, either from the over-use during the weekend or lack of use.  Whatever the case, the idea is ease.  Move with ease into one’s own power and strength.  This is a gentle movement form but that does not mean it is not intense.  We can still move our bodies to get a great strength and/or cardio workout when playing with the healing arts, but it is with greater awareness.

By the middle of the week, Wednesday’s class was perfect for Martial Arts.  Nia students have “recovered” from the weekend so the whole body can be used.  We have the strength to utilize the power of the Tae Kwon Do energy.  The dance can be precise, by this time of the week.  Two days are behind, only three are left (class is in the morning), the desire and focus needed to push on is there.  Sanjana has great opportunity for dynamic ease to be exercised.  There are katas that allow for the fluid moves of martial arts with dance, kicking, punching, blocking, and striking.  In fact the “Exercises” listed in The Nia Technique White Belt Manual* under the Tae Kwon Do craft seems as if they were written expressly for Sanjana.

Friday, unknown to me at the time I planned my dance week, was a great day to do Modern Dance.  With the tsunami that hit Japan over the night (Thursday night for us, Japan’s Friday) it was a great time for dance. Modern Dance calls you to express yourself.  This movement form is one of imagination.  You can be big and/or small, fast and/or slow, a tree, a rock, sand, water, air, even a feeling.  People can truly dance whatever they want.  So while we are still practicing our stances the feelings put into it are those of the participant.  Movements led by me are executed by whatever sense is being experienced.  Many people had different issues and feelings to work through.  Even if some of those feelings were a celebration with the understanding that life is short and precious so we need to celebrate what we have while we have it.  This form is that of balance–both on and off, flexibility, strength, power, drama, emotions . . . whatever fits.  It was a great way to let our bodies move while our hearts went out to all that were affected.

Nia is awesome like that.  We danced the same routine for all three classes this week.  With each class it was different while we paired up the routine with different movement forms.  While the movement forms were able supply the energy, the “feel”, the sensation that was required for the day.

(Thoughts and prayers go out to ALL that are/were/and will be affected by the earthquake in Japan on March 12, 2011 and the subsequent tsunami.)

*March 2001, V# Page 2-19 thru 2-20

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Base

Posted by terrepruitt on July 15, 2010

In Nia our sixth principle for the White Belt is the base.  #6 The Base; Feet and legs.  I sat down to write and as I was searching for something to post about it dawned on me that base came up yesterday and today.   It is a different type of base yet a base is a base so there can be a connection, but in this post I am just going to share the things that came up and later write more on the Nia White Belt Principle #6 in another post.

Yesterday I was out with a friend and we were eating something that she just found divine.  She is one of those creative-in-the-kitchen-people and also trained in the kitchen.  She was breaking down this item.  She was tasting it and eating and trying to discover what it was.  She came up with what she thought it was and then we both lit up when we realized that once she had that—the base, we could do whatever we want with it.  We could make any flavor we want.  It could become the condiment to end all condiments.  It was awesome.  Something you know but when you come across it and see how it can blossom into something or so many other things it is fun to be reminded that things start with a base.

Today, I joined a small group of Nia White Belts to learn some music and work on a routine.  There are not as many Nia teachers down in my part of the Bay, the South Bay as there are in the North Bay and the East Bay so whenever I get to meet with them I get very excited.  We went through the steps that we were taught to go through when learning a routine.  We did the first step in the process.   Then after a couple of times of dancing the song it was clear we pretty much had the base down. The person leading the group started to say, “Or you could . . . .”  “Have the class do this . . . . ” so there is was again . . . the base.  In this case we had the base steps down and once we had that we are free to play a little more.  We can play with speed, levels, or even changing the moves.

I just think it is so interesting that I have had two very strong reminders of the importance of the base.  It is important to have a strong base.  It give your strength and security which will allow you room to grow.  Cool.  Fun.  I love it.

That was my day.  How about you?  Any “base” examples you can thing of?  Anything else you want to share?  Do you have any stories of a “base”?  Maybe a weak base story to help support the idea of how important a strong one is?

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Energy Allies

Posted by terrepruitt on March 30, 2010

When I attended the Nia White Belt Intensive I had not heard of the Four Agreements so I was very captivated by what we refer to as our Energy Allies.  When I decided to attend the Intensive I had only been to four Nia classes and I had decided I wanted to teach it.  I had no idea what to expect.  So these Energy Allies came in handy for me.

We call them friends and rely on them as you would friends.  I am posting these because I often need to be reminded of my friends and I thought I would share them with you.

I was taught:

1–Speak with impeccability
We were reminded to stay “on task”.  Often times in a group setting questions are asked that do not actually relate to the subject being discussed.  Or people like to tell stories about something “sort of” related to the subject.
We were also instructed to use “I”.  When we talk we often tend to project what we are saying instead of saying “I”.

2–Don’t assume anything
Don’t “make up” stories in our head.  We don’t really always know what the story is so we shouldn’t make it up.
-Quiet our inner mind’s conversation.

3–Don’t take anything personally
Don’t get caught up in self-pity or self importance.
Try not to get emotional about a comment.

4–Always do your best
No holding back
Follow instruction
Recognize what is required

I thought this was a GREAT way to start a seminar or in this case an “intensive”.  I wished we could have employed these agreements when I was a corporate trainer.  I think they really assist in keeping the group on task.  When people are allowed to share information that pertains to the subject yet understand that off topic issues will be put on a back burner, that helps keep the subject flow steady.  Keeping the inner mind silent assists in hearing what is being said.  Not taking comments that were made personally allowed the information to be given and received so that it could be useful and not destructive.  Following instructions assisted with the energy in the room.  When we all understood what was required we were all able to focus on the moment’s assignment.

Keeping these four allies around really enabled our group to keep our energy going.  When listening is not at a premium and/or people are emotional about something it really can zap the energy of the collective.

These are friends that can be invited to anything in one’s life.  Do you have these Energy Allies as your friends?  Or are you familiar with the Four Agreements?

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Nia and the Core

Posted by terrepruitt on February 18, 2010

Nia thinks of the pelvis, chest, and head as the core of the body.  Nia is not defining the core muscles or a core muscle group, Nia just includes these three body weights as the core of the body.

The core is Nia White Belt Principle #8.

Alignment of these three weights affects so many things; energy, bones, muscles, organs.  If the alignment is not as it should be all of these things could be affected.

Movement can help properly align these three weights.  Often times some areas of our bodies are stiff and/or tight and by moving our body as it was designed to be moved the stiffness gets worked out and the tightness goes away.  Sometimes that is what is needed to assist in proper alignment.  Other times it might be strengthening or just moving your body in a way it is not accustomed to move.
 
As an example of how we guide a body to alignment, we utilize the bow stance in Nia routines.  A great exercise while in the bow stance is to move the pelvis in all directions.  Moving the pelvis in all directions while in this stance allows for the body to gain or retain mobility.  Mobility in the hips and the spine.  Movement of the pelvis releases energy and muscle tension.  This type of movement also requires strength in the torso and leads up to the chest and head.  While circling or waving the hips the body falls on and off balance and the chest and head must be used to stay upright.  All of this contributes to stability, flexibility, and strength.

We often dance our chest in Nia.  We move our ribs to open them and keep the muscles in between mobile.  We breath deep.  We makes sounds.  We use our chest to guide us in our workout, giving us a different way to move.  This releases blocked energy.

Nia encourages movement of the head in our routines.  We are often moving our head on its own or to lead us through a move.  We employ our hands and our eyes to help us move our head.  Not all cardio workout classes employ the use of the head and it seems as if a lot of people are just plain ol’ not used to moving their head.  So caution is always recommended.  Since moving the head stimulates two chakras it is sometimes very powerful and some people get dizzy until they are used to it. 

When these three body weights are in alignment sense calm.  When our body is strong yet flexible and capable of mobility it assist us in keep our body weights aligned correctly even when we move we feel confident and have a sense of wellness.
 
The Nia White Belt Manual* has over 15 pages addressing the pelvis, chest, and head.  I think that means that there will be more posts regarding the core and/or its parts, because Nia has a lot of information that I can share about the core.

*The Nia White Belt Manual was created by Debbie Rosas and Carlos Rosas as was Nia (the Nia Technique).  All of this information is based off of information from their trainings and the White Belt Manual and the Nia Technique Book

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Nia Routines

Posted by terrepruitt on February 4, 2010

I always get questions about the Nia Routines.  Are teachers given the routines?  Do teachers make up their own routines?  How many routines are there?  And more.  In this post I’ll just cover those three questions.

At the time of this writing there are 18 Nia routines showing on the teacher website for purchase.  I know in the 26 years that Nia has been around there have been a lot more.  I believe back when Nia started having routines, music rights and all that big business part of music was not an issue.  Now, I think, that portion of life has affected Nia and the routines.  I think they had to remove some from sale.

A routine is group of songs.  I think 8 to 10 is the average, but it depends on the length of the songs.  An average Nia workout class is about 55 minutes, give or take a few minutes.  At the time of this post Carlos and Debbie were the creators of the routines.

As a teacher, we purchase a routine which includes a DVD disc, a music CD, and an information pamphlet.  It is an amazing piece of educational material.  This post is not about the fabulous package of material we receive or about learning the routine, it is just general information about Nia routines.  But whenever I talk about the Nia routine packages I feel compelled to exclaim how wonderful they are. I will save the explanation of them for another post.

Teachers are encouraged to use their own creativity when leading a routine.  Nia routines are very well thought out and put together.  It is my understanding that with higher belt levels choreography is discussed, but with White Belts, Nia encourages them to use the routines that Nia has created.  But at the same time we are encouraged to do the katas to different music than we are given.

With the encouragement of using our own creativity, I believe comes the impression that we can do things in Natural Time and to me, that means we can adjust routines.  A kata might be less aerobic, but if we want to help make it more so we can add cha-cha-chas in place of a regular step, or just do fast side steps instead of a grapevine.

In addition to changing simple steps we are empowered with all of the different Movement Forms.  When we employ the energies of the different movement forms they can change the routine dramatically.

I do mix up the katas from various routines to “create” new routines.  To me this gives the participants a feeling of doing something new, yet at the same time they are moving to familiar patterns.  Or once, I had an out of town friend attending my classes, after the first class, she admitted she couldn’t do turns.  Well, if she were going to be my student for any length of time, you know I would put those in and work with her on them, but since she was only going to be in one more class, I put together katas that didn’t have turns so she would enjoy her workout more.

When I do mix it up, I make certain I adhere to the seven cycles of Nia.  I also try to make it a well-rounded routine.  I love it when I put something together and afterwards the class says, “Ahhh, I really liked that routine, what was it?”

I hope this helped to answer some of the questions about Nia routines.  Please let me know if you have other question.

I am going to continue to you invite you, my reader to a Nia class.  If you are ever visiting the San Jose/South Bay Area or you are local to me, please, come to one of mine :-).  If you are not local, look up a class near you and try Nia in your area.

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Nia and the 8BC System

Posted by terrepruitt on January 5, 2010

Music and the 8BC System is Nia White Belt Principle #3. This is part 2 of the principle, a brief bit about the 8BC System.

To learn our music, us Nia teachers, literally map out our music. We measure our music using a system of notations called bars.  This is our map. We count out our music 1-and-2-and-3-and-4-and-5-and-6-and-7-and-8-and.  Each bar has 16 counts. We count out the song noting the bars on a page. Then we go through and “dress” the bars adding marks to the page making notes of the sounds we hear.  We use the noted sounds as cues for the choreography in a routine. No matter if the movements are matching the music or going opposite to it, the instruments and sounds are our cues.

By mapping our music, (“barring” our music) we get to know our music really well.  Knowing our music really well allows us to easily play with the choreography, while at the same time, sticking to the basics of it.  We can also take the music that we have learned while learning a routine and add different choreography to it.

Also practicing this barring system ensures that we can take any music and dance the Nia choreography to it.  We just match the Nia music up with music that has the same count and we can pretty much just “plug” in the Nia choreography.

All of this allows us to have fun while exercising and doing our Nia routines/Nia workouts.

I have taken to the practice of mapping out my music and then scanning it so that I will have a completely mapped out song so when I am ready to add different choreography to it, I can just print my music map and put in the movement portion on my barred music.

Mapping the music allows for so much creativity.  Instead of just dancing to the beat you can dance to one instrument, you can allow your body to “BE” the cymbal or the flute, or you can shimmy to the melody, or sway to the harmony.  It is fun to play with the music.  And you can do whatever you want and lead your class through it all because you have a map!

Since music is such a big part of Nia, I am sure that I will visit this topic often.  I might even come back to the Nia White Belt Principle #3.

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Nia and Music

Posted by terrepruitt on January 2, 2010

Music and the 8BC System is Nia White Belt Principle #3. This is part 1 of the principle, a brief bit about Nia and Music.

Nia is so much about the music.  As teachers we learn to dance to the music. So as we lead our participants through the workout routines it is more like dance than exercise.  Sometimes we count the number of our movements as we are leading the class, but when we know our music well, we are to go to the music and use its cues and not rely on the count of the moves.  So when I am leading a class and I am in a section where I am counting if I get distracted from my count, I can just listen to the music and know exactly where I am.  Honestly, some songs I know better than others and I can accomplish this, some I am still learning. It is a process. It is amazing. 

Music is powerful and has been used for teaching and healing.  Your entire body can listen.  Your body can respond to the music it senses.  The body can sense the vibration.

There have been studies done that equate specific tempos with specific moods and/or emotions, in Nia we play with all of that.  We can go with the music or play the opposite. A stereo-typical “happy” song, we might practice as sad and slow or excited and angry. It is a great exercise for the body as well as the mind and spirit to sense music one way and move to it in another, as an example, like previously mentioned; while “happy” is playing move to it as if you are sad or tired. It is a wonderful challenge.

It is energizing to play with the music. The rhythm or beat of the music is said to be the male or Yang energy of music.  The melody is the feminine or Yin side.  Harmony blends it together stimulating the spiritual energy. You can dance to the rhythm or the beat or move to the melody, or have your senses stimulated by the harmony. When you let your body sense the music you can dance it all.

There are so many ways to play with music. Another way to use music as a workout tool is to visualize what type of sound your body parts would make, match them up with the music as you listen and when you hear that sound activate that body part. Again, challenging your body, your mind, and your spirit. Getting the whole body workout that Nia is known for and at the same time letting the music be the motivation for the movement.

Nia is a workout, but it is a workout that allows you to exercise your body along with your mind and your spirit. It allows participants to be moved by the music in the body’s way. It really is so much about the music.

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Review Blog Year – Top Ten

Posted by terrepruitt on December 31, 2009

So here it is the end of the year.  I have been blogging since March (2009).  I have posted 130 times.  This is 131.  I thought I would end the year with a review of some of my favorites and according to the numbers some of your favorites too.  Here they are, not in any order:

Lyrics Gone Wrong . . . I had entertained the idea of doing this once a month, but after the second month I ran out of songs to play with.

Interesting Picture – Marilyn Monroe Albert Einstein . . . I LOVE optical illusions and this one is a doosey.

Hummingbird Tongues . . . they still fascinate me and I am still surprising people with the fact that the birds have tongues and use them more than the beak is a straw.  And usually they tongues dart in and out so fast it is a rare treat to catch it out for a picture.  Yay!

A Poem Says A Lot . . . Fabulous!  We Have Come To Be Danced . . .

Nia Belt System . . . Before you can move onto the next belt they say a year must pass.   You do not have to get involved.  It is a great workout without being involved with the belts.  The belt system only comes into play if you care to get that involved in Nia.  Nia’s belts mimic some Martial Arts; white, green, blue, brown, black.    I am learning so much with my White Belt, I can see myself waiting at least another year before I move onto the next belt.  There is so much to learn and enjoy in each belt, I am not in a hurry.

Say: “I Am Wonderful” . . . I like to say this, I like to hear this song.  I like to remind people to go to iTunes each week to download the free song.

A Brief Look At Nia . . . still excited to share Nia with people.  It is a great body-mind practice and a workout that can make you sweat yet not really feel like exercise.  It is learning to follow the body’s way.

Wrapping Tips . . . WHAT?  I was shocked that everyone did not read my blog.  On Christmas Day and the day after the bags and bags and bags and bags of wrapping trash that I saw on the curbs just blew my mind. In this day and in these times, I was just utterly flabbergasted that people don’t re-use the wrappings.  It amazed and saddened me.

My Favorite Mugs . . . so I found out that not everyone got my little joke.  Ya know, back in the day (what day, I don’t know), they used to call faces mugs . . . get it now?

The Seven Cycles Of A Nia Workout . . . The workout has cycles, somewhat like Jazzercise.  I like to share this aspect of Nia so people have an idea of what a workout class will be like.  We set a focus and an intent, step in, warm up and move all the way through the cycles to the floor, and then we step out.

Well, thank you so much for joining me on my blog.  I hope that you continue to read, I hope you enjoy and learn.  I learn from your comments so keep them coming.  Thank you for a great year.  Here is to the NewYear.

But . . .before we jump into the New Year, share with me what your favorite post from my blog was?  AND/OR give me ideas on what you would like to see posted in the New Year.

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The Joy Of Movement

Posted by terrepruitt on December 19, 2009

Nia White Belt Principle #1 is The Joy of Movement.  Debbie Rosas and Carlos Rosas were in the fitness industry back in the 1980’s when they felt the pull to do something different.  From what I understand they didn’t know exactly what they were going to do.  They just were seeing a lot of injuries in the aerobic industry and decided that working out in a way that injured one’s body was not the right way to be working out.  They decided they wanted to workout in a way that allowed for honoring the body and for appreciating the body.

Debbie and Carlos did not just meet one day and decided to put a bunch of things together and “Voila!  There is Nia!” . . . . it grew out of years of learning.  As you look through information regarding Nia you can see some of the transformations it has gone through.  Nothing big enough to make you think that it is not what it was when it start, but there are some changes.  But one think that they found constant from the beginning was an incredible feeling of Joy.

They recognized that as a special element of Nia.  They also recognized that as more of a sensation than a feeling.  They determined that it was something that the body actually sensed when it was allowed to move as it was designed to do.  Joy could be used as an energy to fuel the workout.  Joy, as a body sensation can be called upon no matter what one is FEELING.

The Nia White Belt Manual explains how Joy is more of an attitude toward the body, and attitude toward life.  When you sense this Universal Joy you work to stay connected to it.

In a workout or a dance you can actually choose to have Joy be your energy.  Then you sense Joy as a sensation.  While you are moving thoughts and feelings might come into your workout / dance, but ideally you are just noticing them but not dwelling on anyone in particular.  And you are retaining the Joy.

You are encouraged to sustain the Joy and the way of moving that allows you to sense Joy.  If you feel Joy slipping or that you are no longer sensing the Joy of Movement you can tweak what you are doing, the way you are doing it, to increase that sense of Joy.

During a Nia workout the teacher guides you through the moves of the routine, but it is up to you—the participant—to move in a way that brings you Joy.

If you remember anything about Nia, remember this:  that the soul of Nia is the Joy of Movement.  It is the physical celebration of the body.**

**Direct quote from The Nia Technique – White Belt Manual by Debbie Rosas and Carlos Rosas  March 2001, V3

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